AKB Meerschaum Pipe

Sinan Altinok

In business since 2002
#23
"push type" should generally denote the 2 mm opening, inferior quality white plastic tenons as @Kiowapipe showed samples in a picture which we all here had to use it many years. Once I had a chance to start working with a German supplier about the black teflon tenons, I left the plastic one forever. The words "Briar type" meant that particular one which also labeled the meerschaum pipes first time on a website (guess whose) at that time :) It's much more durable, wider opening (3 mm) and heat resistant. You don't have to keep a spare of it because it is quite long lasting.
 

Sinan Altinok

In business since 2002
#24
I wish Altinok would get a U.S. distributor for their meers. I dont like waiting 3+ weeks to receive my pipe. I'm getting more impatient as I get older. They are exceptional pipes though. I have 4. I recently bought a IMP.
I'm pleased with it.
Just a note; a quicker option is the Express Shipping which is promised a delivery in a few days all the way to the States ($49).
 
#28
I recently bought an Tekin AKB Meerschaum pipe from Smoking Pipes.

It has the older style push/ pull tenon with the screw in parts, as pictured in this thread. Since I don't need to take it apart to pass a pipe cleaner, I am hoping the reduced wear and tear means the attachments last longer.

It seems to smoke well enough.

I would have preferred the briar style, but for $90 it meets my needs well enough.

I think "akb meershaum" is just a name that Smoking Pipes came up with. The line doesn't look any different than the Meerschaum Depot pipes that P and C sells.
 

Siv

Mg4Si6O15(OH)2·6H2O
#30
I just noticed that smokingpipes is now including the name of the carver on some of their pipes. This is the first time I've noticed that. IMP is not an individual carver either to my knowledge - someone else may know more. To quote from their website:
IMP meerschaum pipes are hand made by skilled craftsmen in stages. Someone often roughs out the shape, and a master comes in later to do the detailing (such as the figural pipes).
So the product may not be from a single individual but a collaboration between less skilled carvers and the more experienced ones.

I'm not hugely up on the Turkish meerschaum business but what I've seen is that there are many carvers who in the past rarely signed their pipes - perhaps with the exception of their more artistic pieces. They also seem to make similar designs to each other so it's hard to tell the carver just by looking at them. I believe Deniz Ural encouraged Baki to sign his pipes (I think even buying him the pantograph to make this possible) which has now, over time and the popularity of Baki, perhaps led to more carvers signing their more conventional wares.
 

dmkerr

Fabulously non-descript
Staff member
#31
I just noticed that smokingpipes is now including the name of the carver on some of their pipes. This is the first time I've noticed that. IMP is not an individual carver either to my knowledge - someone else may know more. To quote from their website:

So the product may not be from a single individual but a collaboration between less skilled carvers and the more experienced ones.

I'm not hugely up on the Turkish meerschaum business but what I've seen is that there are many carvers who in the past rarely signed their pipes - perhaps with the exception of their more artistic pieces. They also seem to make similar designs to each other so it's hard to tell the carver just by looking at them. I believe Deniz Ural encouraged Baki to sign his pipes (I think even buying him the pantograph to make this possible) which has now, over time and the popularity of Baki, perhaps led to more carvers signing their more conventional wares.
Correct on all counts. Mustafa Albayrak is the master carver at IMP that I'm familiar with - there may be others. But I've always thought of him as the IMP Master Carver. I know he's carved some of their pipes himself but he probably farms out some of the more simple work.

Meerschaum pipe signing, as far as I know, started with Ismet Bekler at CAO in the 1980's. I can't recall any other meers from that time or earlier that were signed routinely, although as you mentioned, certain carvers signed some of their more ornate work. Yanik's father signed some of his. The other main brand to reach the States back then was SMS and they were very rarely signed, although I saw one that was - can't recall the carver but it wasn't a name I recognize as carving today.

I don't think any Altinoks are signed but on the ones I bought, the carver was noted on a certificate inside the box. As you said, Baki now signs everything. His very early work had his named carved into the actual block. Yanik signs everything, Baglan signs, most of them do nowadays and I agree that it was Baki that started this trend, although I can't say positively. Signing the pipe adds to its value. An unsigned meerschaum by, say, Bekler, would be worth less than a signed piece, even though the workmanship is the same. And shoot, I've smoked a number of his meers and they don't hold a candle to a Baki, Altinok or IMP. The biggest issue with older meers (and some newer ones!) is that these guys are meerschaum carvers, not pipemakers... at least not from a proper physics perspective. Yaniks pipes are hit or miss - enough misses to make it a straight-on crapshoot.