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Altinay

blackmouth210

Well-known member
#13
I have an oom paul. The draw isn't very open, I had assumed it had something to do with the shape but perhaps not. Although when I take it apart the draw through the stem is fine, but not so much through the stummel, so maybe it is the shape
View attachment 22308 View attachment 22309 View attachment 22310
Holy cow! That's a gorgeous meer.
I know that doesn't address the air flow issue.
But, goodness, that Altinay knocked my socks off. :thumb-yello:
 

Cheeseybacon

Well-known member
#15
@Cheeseybacon @Kraken insee you have an altinay. Thoughts?
Yes, I have a few thoughts. My apologies ahead of time for my long-winded pontificating.

I first bought myself an Altinay pipe at the end of Summer in 2017. It was a warm evening, the cacophony of insects were roaring in the yard all around me. I was relaxing on my deck, rather inebriated from drinking Victory Sour Monkey Ale (9.5% ABV) and smoking a Virginia of some kind in a MM General cob. I had been thinking about getting a Meerschaum again for quite a while, and after a tragic experience with an eBay Strambach special, I had resigned myself to spend some more money next time and go with something better. I looked at all of the usual names that most people seem to speak highly of: Altinook, IMP, Baki, etc. The one thing that most of them didn't have much of, or any at all, were pipes that accepted 9mm filters. Yes, I am that guy, one of the few weirdos outside of Germany that actually prefers using 9mm filters when possible. This ultimately lead me to Altinay, which at the time had (maybe they still do?) a substantial inventory of pipes that were capable of accepting a 9mm filter. This was literally the only reason why I ultimately chose Altinay over all the other brands, my penchant for filters is that strong. I picked up a small, partially bent, smooth billiard. In my compromised state at the time the forward canted bowl had me thinking it was a cutty. Alas, the next afternoon when a sober head finally prevailed, I realized it was not. Oh well, it eventually grew on me.

altinay_1.jpg

The pipe smoked well enough, but not what I could classify as beautifully. Even without a filter in place, the pipe was lacking something in the way it breathed and it frequently clogged about midway though the bowl. Perhaps it was nothing more than coincidental poor packing/tamping on my part, but I never encountered the same kind of clogging in any of my briars. Ultimately I got around this through a modification of the 3-step packing method. Instead of the tamping the tobacco like you're shaking a child's hand, then a woman's, then a man's, I basically gave the first 2 packs a "child"-level tamping, with the 3rd pack being the "woman" tamping. This helped a lot, but given the fact the bowl was already narrow and small, it made for a short smoke, no more than 20 minutes. The quality of the Meerschaum itself was excellent. A very clear and pure taste of just the tobacco. I never noticed any ghosting and smoked every genre of tobacco imaginable in it, from goopers to plugs. Due to it's thin walls, it immediately it began to color and displayed all kinds of wonderful orange and brown hues that I never saw on my previous "cultivated" meerschaum pipe.

The bit on the stem was unfortunately quite thick. I've had pipes with all manner of different bit thicknesses, some were thicker and thinner than others but nothing that was truly aggravating. This was the first bit I ever encountered that genuinely bothered me and felt awkward to clench. I despise Peterson P-lips, but I would have gladly taken one over this thing. I eventually gave up trying to clench it or use it with a softie bit for that matter. I fully intended to have a different stem made for it, but unfortunately I never did for reasons that I will elaborate on now.
thick_bit.jpg

Mind you, I didn't really put the pipe through its paces up to this point. It simply went into the rotation with all of the briars and was probably smoked 2-3 times a month, or when trying a new tobacco for the first time. It wasn't until March Meerschaum Maddness of 2018 that it saw regular and exclusive use for the entire duration of march. During that month I probably put 15-20 bowls though it and was very pleased with how it started to color. Towards the end of March I began to notice some rather off-putting, "plastic-y" flavors coming from pipe. They weren't present when the pipe was cold and typically didn't begin to manifest themselves until after the bowl had some heat to it, not until I was maybe a third to half of the way through the bowl. Having used the pipe more often than usual, and hoping the pipe was simply dirtier than usual, I gave it a more-thorough-than-usual cleaning. In the process of doing so I discovered that the glue on the reverse tenon had crumbled, allowing the tenon to easily unscrew from the shank with zero resistance:

burnt_tenon.jpg

When I first examined the tenon, I noticed the end of it which faced the bowl was quite black. Figuring it was merely filthy (and it was) I set about attacking the tenon with pipe cleaners, a toothbrush and some Everclear. Despite my diligent cleaning, no amount of scrubbing made even a dent in the black crud on the end of the tenon. Examining it closer I quickly realized, to my horror, that it wasn't soot or ash, rather the plastic itself was burned, melted and completely cooked. Now, I will concede I can't begin to tell you exactly why this happened. Could I have smoked it too hot one evening? Yeah, entirely possible I suppose. Could the placement of the end of the tenon been too close to the the bowl? Sure, also a possibility.

shank_tenon_compare.jpg

Whatever the reason, the end of the tenon was roasted, toasted, and burnt to a crisp and ever since then a plastic-y taste emanates from the pipe about halfway through. Near as I my untrained eyes can tell, the pipe does not appear to have any threads tapped into the meerschaum itself, but rather there appears to be an insert inside the shank which the tenon threads into. I can't tell what this insert is made of but I fear that something may also be melted and/or FUBAR'd in this insert as well which is contributing to the lousy taste.

shank_insert.jpg

Needless to say, I don't smoke this pipe anymore, it just tastes awful. I have wrestled with the idea of sending it off to someone to be worked on, but I have my doubts as to whether anyone could salvage it. If anyone has any suggestions, I'm all ears.

It is also worth mentioning that in December of 2017, my cousin picked up an Altinay pipe as well, a smooth Canadian, also 9mm with the identical style tenon system. Altinay makes all kinds of Canadians, Lovats, Lumbermans, etc with long shanks, and it is these types of pipes that I recommend if you are thinking about an Altinay, based upon my experience. The long shank distances the plastic tenon system far enough away from the bowl that the heat doesn't cause any problems. My cousin furiously smokes his Altinay way more than I ever smoked mine and it is holding up beautifully to this day, smokes a helluva lot better than mine did and has a way nicer bit as well. Different pipe designs and different carvers totally change the smoking experience even within the same brand. They are not all duds like mine. Also, Canadian meerschaums look really neat with that long shank all colored up. I'll see about getting a picture.

Note: all of the aforementioned info was specific to Altinay pipes that accept 9mm filters. It's entirely possible that their non-filtered pipes (of which there are many) suffer from none of the ills that I experienced with my pipe... or perhaps have different issues of their own. I cannot speak to that.

Anywho, that's all I have to say about Altinay right now.
 
Last edited:

Cheeseybacon

Well-known member
#17
Using a 9mm filter with a meerschaum seems like gilding the lily.

They already smoke near as dry as a filter pipe.
From a dryness standpoint, yes, you are absolutely right, definitely a case of guilding the lily.

That said... I will be the first to admit I am wimp when it comes to nicotine and the activated carbon filters do make a big difference in that department.

 
#18
Altinay is a Person and the Owner of that Company. You are right: many pipes are carved By employees and freelancers
Dear Sir,
Thanks for your partially correct comment.
With your permission,
Briefly;
Altınay Pipe Co. Ltd. was founded in Eskisehir/Turkey in 1964 by Necdet ALTINAY, when 23 years old, as a small meerschaum carving workshop.
Altinay carved his first meerschaum pipe at 14 years of age.
The master carver Necdet ALTINAY has trained other carvers of repute including Nedim Altınay(son) and Said ALTINAY(grandson), who trained under him.
ALTINAY sells pipes for export, made by master Nedim and Said in their own workshop.
They currently produce pipes with their own brand ALTINAY besides Andreas Bauer, Rattray's line of meerschaum pipes as well.

So our pipes are carved by us -Nedim&Said-. But sometimes we also include pipes of different masters on our website.

Regards
Said ALTINAY
Master & Co-owner
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
#19
Dear Sir,
Thanks for your partially correct comment.
With your permission,
Briefly;
Altınay Pipe Co. Ltd. was founded in Eskisehir/Turkey in 1964 by Necdet ALTINAY, when 23 years old, as a small meerschaum carving workshop.
Altinay carved his first meerschaum pipe at 14 years of age.
The master carver Necdet ALTINAY has trained other carvers of repute including Nedim Altınay(son) and Said ALTINAY(grandson), who trained under him.
ALTINAY sells pipes for export, made by master Nedim and Said in their own workshop.
They currently produce pipes with their own brand ALTINAY besides Andreas Bauer, Rattray's line of meerschaum pipes as well.

So our pipes are carved by us -Nedim&Said-. But sometimes we also include pipes of different masters on our website.

Regards
Said ALTINAY
Master & Co-owner
Thank you for that Informationen
 
#20
Yes, I have a few thoughts. My apologies ahead of time for my long-winded pontificating.

I first bought myself an Altinay pipe at the end of Summer in 2017. It was a warm evening, the cacophony of insects were roaring in the yard all around me. I was relaxing on my deck, rather inebriated from drinking Victory Sour Monkey Ale (9.5% ABV) and smoking a Virginia of some kind in a MM General cob. I had been thinking about getting a Meerschaum again for quite a while, and after a tragic experience with an eBay Strambach special, I had resigned myself to spend some more money next time and go with something better. I looked at all of the usual names that most people seem to speak highly of: Altinook, IMP, Baki, etc. The one thing that most of them didn't have much of, or any at all, were pipes that accepted 9mm filters. Yes, I am that guy, one of the few weirdos outside of Germany that actually prefers using 9mm filters when possible. This ultimately lead me to Altinay, which at the time had (maybe they still do?) a substantial inventory of pipes that were capable of accepting a 9mm filter. This was literally the only reason why I ultimately chose Altinay over all the other brands, my penchant for filters is that strong. I picked up a small, partially bent, smooth billiard. In my compromised state at the time the forward canted bowl had me thinking it was a cutty. Alas, the next afternoon when a sober head finally prevailed, I realized it was not. Oh well, it eventually grew on me.

View attachment 22300

The pipe smoked well enough, but not what I could classify as beautifully. Even without a filter in place, the pipe was lacking something in the way it breathed and it frequently clogged about midway though the bowl. Perhaps it was nothing more than coincidental poor packing/tamping on my part, but I never encountered the same kind of clogging in any of my briars. Ultimately I got around this through a modification of the 3-step packing method. Instead of the tamping the tobacco like you're shaking a child's hand, then a woman's, then a man's, I basically gave the first 2 packs a "child"-level tamping, with the 3rd pack being the "woman" tamping. This helped a lot, but given the fact the bowl was already narrow and small, it made for a short smoke, no more than 20 minutes. The quality of the Meerschaum itself was excellent. A very clear and pure taste of just the tobacco. I never noticed any ghosting and smoked every genre of tobacco imaginable in it, from goopers to plugs. Due to it's thin walls, it immediately it began to color and displayed all kinds of wonderful orange and brown hues that I never saw on my previous "cultivated" meerschaum pipe.

The bit on the stem was unfortunately quite thick. I've had pipes with all manner of different bit thicknesses, some were thicker and thinner than others but nothing that was truly aggravating. This was the first bit I ever encountered that genuinely bothered me and felt awkward to clench. I despise Peterson P-lips, but I would have gladly taken one over this thing. I eventually gave up trying to clench it or use it with a softie bit for that matter. I fully intended to have a different stem made for it, but unfortunately I never did for reasons that I will elaborate on now.
View attachment 22313

Mind you, I didn't really put the pipe through its paces up to this point. It simply went into the rotation with all of the briars and was probably smoked 2-3 times a month, or when trying a new tobacco for the first time. It wasn't until March Meerschaum Maddness of 2018 that it saw regular and exclusive use for the entire duration of march. During that month I probably put 15-20 bowls though it and was very pleased with how it started to color. Towards the end of March I began to notice some rather off-putting, "plastic-y" flavors coming from pipe. They weren't present when the pipe was cold and typically didn't begin to manifest themselves until after the bowl had some heat to it, not until I was maybe a third to half of the way through the bowl. Having used the pipe more often than usual, and hoping the pipe was simply dirtier than usual, I gave it a more-thorough-than-usual cleaning. In the process of doing so I discovered that the glue on the reverse tenon had crumbled, allowing the tenon to easily unscrew from the shank with zero resistance:

View attachment 22304

When I first examined the tenon, I noticed the end of it which faced the bowl was quite black. Figuring it was merely filthy (and it was) I set about attacking the tenon with pipe cleaners, a toothbrush and some Everclear. Despite my diligent cleaning, no amount of scrubbing made even a dent in the black crud on the end of the tenon. Examining it closer I quickly realized, to my horror, that it wasn't soot or ash, rather the plastic itself was burned, melted and completely cooked. Now, I will concede I can't begin to tell you exactly why this happened. Could I have smoked it too hot one evening? Yeah, entirely possible I suppose. Could the placement of the end of the tenon been too close to the the bowl? Sure, also a possibility.

View attachment 22305

Whatever the reason, the end of the tenon was roasted, toasted, and burnt to a crisp and ever since then a plastic-y taste emanates from the pipe about halfway through. Near as I my untrained eyes can tell, the pipe does not appear to have any threads tapped into the meerschaum itself, but rather there appears to be an insert inside the shank which the tenon threads into. I can't tell what this insert is made of but I fear that something may also be melted and/or FUBAR'd in this insert as well which is contributing to the lousy taste.

View attachment 22311

Needless to say, I don't smoke this pipe anymore, it just tastes awful. I have wrestled with the idea of sending it off to someone to be worked on, but I have my doubts as to whether anyone could salvage it. If anyone has any suggestions, I'm all ears.

It is also worth mentioning that in December of 2017, my cousin picked up an Altinay pipe as well, a smooth Canadian, also 9mm with the identical style tenon system. Altinay makes all kinds of Canadians, Lovats, Lumbermans, etc with long shanks, and it is these types of pipes that I recommend if you are thinking about an Altinay, based upon my experience. The long shank distances the plastic tenon system far enough away from the bowl that the heat doesn't cause any problems. My cousin furiously smokes his Altinay way more than I ever smoked mine and it is holding up beautifully to this day, smokes a helluva lot better than mine did and has a way nicer bit as well. Different pipe designs and different carvers totally change the smoking experience even within the same brand. They are not all duds like mine. Also, Canadian meerschaums look really neat with that long shank all colored up. I'll see about getting a picture.

Note: all of the aforementioned info was specific to Altinay pipes that accept 9mm filters. It's entirely possible that their non-filtered pipes (of which there are many) suffer from none of the ills that I experienced with my pipe... or perhaps have different issues of their own. I cannot speak to that.

Anywho, that's all I have to say about Altinay right now.
Dear Sir,
Thanks for your valuable comment.
We are sorry for your problem.
We would expect you to contact us about your problem, we always stand behind our products.
Our customers satisfaction is really important to us.

You can contact with us and send your pipe for solving the problem and full care (rewaxing, cleaning cake etc..)

I also want to share these informations;
We also use briar style teflon tenons and silver army & spigot systems that can be convertible to 9mm by a simple single drilling process.
And our pipes have 3mm airways.@DGErwin11

Meerschaum-Pipes-ALTINAY-5-15-560x400.jpg Meerschaum-Pipes-ALTINAY-8-1-560x400.jpg
Meerschaum-Pipes-ALTINAY-2-16-560x400.jpg Meerschaum-Pipes-ALTINAY-4-15-560x400.jpg

And lastly we solved the nylon tenon burns with metal cap.
IMG_20190123_105042 (1).jpg

We use these tenon systems on 9mm filter pipes due to strenght of the pipe shank.
As you know the meerschaum is a quite gentle material. So we insist on this system, as wide gaps can reduce strength.
However we are working for development on connection systems for meerschaum pipes.

Thank you for your understanding.

Regards
Said ALTINAY
Master & Co-Owner