Basic snuff recipe

Olmstead

Well-known member
PSD Slow Smoke Winner
#25
It does seem very wet though. What made you decide to diverge from @Wooda OG post?
I dug up a thread on the Snuffhouse forums where there was a similar recipe. The instructions were for 2tbsp of water and 2tbsp of tobacco, then to dry it in an oven. That batch is wet, no doubt. I made a second batch this morning, and the result is in the photo below. It's much drier, but it'll still need to be dried with heat.
20190911_210023_HDR.jpg
Although the OP on the Snuffhouse thread provided a lot of info about snuffmaking, it seems to be like any craft; lots of trial and error, and I expect there to be plenty of error along the way.
 

Peacock

There is no spoon.
Patron
#26
I dug up a thread on the Snuffhouse forums where there was a similar recipe. The instructions were for 2tbsp of water and 2tbsp of tobacco, then to dry it in an oven. That batch is wet, no doubt. I made a second batch this morning, and the result is in the photo below. It's much drier, but it'll still need to be dried with heat.

Although the OP on the Snuffhouse thread provided a lot of info about snuffmaking, it seems to be like any craft; lots of trial and error, and I expect there to be plenty of error along the way.
Waiiit a minute... I think you forgot to put tobacco in that snuff! 😜
 

Peacock

There is no spoon.
Patron
#28
I dug up a thread on the Snuffhouse forums where there was a similar recipe. The instructions were for 2tbsp of water and 2tbsp of tobacco, then to dry it in an oven. That batch is wet, no doubt. I made a second batch this morning, and the result is in the photo below. It's much drier, but it'll still need to be dried with heat.
View attachment 41401
Although the OP on the Snuffhouse thread provided a lot of info about snuffmaking, it seems to be like any craft; lots of trial and error, and I expect there to be plenty of error along the way.
Looks great!
 

Wooda

Cob Cobbler
Sales
#29
I dug up a thread on the Snuffhouse forums where there was a similar recipe. The instructions were for 2tbsp of water and 2tbsp of tobacco, then to dry it in an oven. That batch is wet, no doubt. I made a second batch this morning, and the result is in the photo below. It's much drier, but it'll still need to be dried with heat.
Nothing wrong with a light cook. It might even improve your base tobaccos.

Although the OP on the Snuffhouse thread provided a lot of info about snuffmaking, it seems to be like any craft; lots of trial and error, and I expect there to be plenty of error along the way.
There is no wrong way. Every snuff house has their own proprietary process, and they all make wonderful toots.

This recipe is intended to be the most basic of foundations; the springboard from which to launch yourself into the deep pool of nasal delivered tobac.

For the "basic recipe" the water ratio is the bare minimum needed to fully wet the tobacco, therefore evenly distribute the sodium carbonate, but also allowing it to be tootable without cooking.
 

Olmstead

Well-known member
PSD Slow Smoke Winner
#30
@Wooda I'm going to make another batch following your recipe's idea of wetting the tobacco just enough to distribute the sodium carbonate and salt. My one worry is that the tobacco I'm using has some sort of casing on it; I've read in several places over the last couple years that everything sold as pipe tobacco is cased, and I wouldn't doubt it.

I took a sniff of some of the super-fine tobacco clinging to the lid of the grinder that I used to make the recipe. It wasn't bad at all, but it also wasn't anything like snuff, aside from the grind. It had a sweetness to it that I can't quite explain, and I'm guessing that it's sugar. I might have to get some truly plain leaf in order to get the results I'm hoping for. Time will tell!

Thanks for your positive reply. :sailor:
 

Olmstead

Well-known member
PSD Slow Smoke Winner
#31
Today I made some toasted snuff in a stainless steel cup from a batch of straight C&D blending "Dark Burley". It's just cooling off now, and it's the first batch I've made so far that actually smells like snuff. I'm going to take my time on finishing it with a bit of essences via infusion once it's dried, but because it turned out nicely so far, I wanted to share a photo.
20191009_203748.jpg
We'll see!
 

Olmstead

Well-known member
PSD Slow Smoke Winner
#32
Almost dried enough to call it snuff. Before today it was essentially a snus, just not cooked long enough to call it that (though it has seen a lot of heat). Right now it's just dry enough to sample, so I had two pinches - with very low expectations - and it was surprisingly good. Lo and behold, it's pretty strong too (must be the dark burley).

Now all that's left is to dry it out a little more and put it through the mortar and pestle again to get an nice even texture, then add a light scent.
20191011_215944.jpg Although good quality snuff is pretty cheap and easy to get, it's always rewarding to make something yourself and enjoy the fruits of your labor. It's not a totally finished product yet, but I'm pretty sure this is an experiment worth repeating.

Below is another batch I made a week before. I'll be putting this in the mortar and pestle as well. Lumps seem to be a natural part of the process, but this batch had less because it was made with less water. Both were made with C&D Bright VA and Dark Burley in a 1:1 ratio.
20190911_224707_HDR.jpg
And yes, after threethree weeks of aging in a jar in the fridge, they both smell like and have a 'nose feel' of proper snuff with no funky odors or pipe tobacco type qualities. Also, no burn, but a satisfying snuff feel (probably due to the salt and sodium carbonate).
 

Olmstead

Well-known member
PSD Slow Smoke Winner
#35
In the last couple of weeks I've further aged and carefully scented my snuff with an infusion method (no direct application of extracts or 'saucing') trying to get an SP-type aroma. I then picked up a marble mortar and pestle at a local store, and after using it, realized that it's a must-have tool in a snuff maker's arsenal.
20191024_105515.jpg
The scent is lightly citrus-y and dominated by a nice plain tobacco aroma. Unlike when I started, it no longer smells like pipe tobacco at all, but rather exactly like store-bought snuff of the darker variety.

My hope was to get something comparable to SWS snuff, and I have to say that although I'm no pro, I'm honestly not all that far off the mark. Aside from time and patience, it's been surprisingly easy. With a few minor tweaks to this recipe - expanding on the aroma infusion stage, and using just a little less salt and sodium carbonate - I just might have a great new source of snuff.

In the coming weeks, I'm hoping to get a large batch of this recipe going so that I might share some of this with my fellow snuff enthusiasts here in order to get your feedback and share the love! I'm also going to be looking at some other tobaccos to work with, although this C&D blending Burley and Virginia worked very well, and it's pretty strong nicotine-wise.

Thanks again to the OP, Wooda, for starting this thread and igniting my new-found hobby!
 

RedScot

Well-known member
#39
I'm getting kickstarted on making my own snuff this week and it seems way simpler than trying to make palatable pipe tobacco...although I'm trying that too.
I'm using air-cured leaves from last year's crop and I'm in the middle of grinding the dried leaves, but I've been very cautious about the next step(s), unsure of the next step. This thread is a great jumping off point. Thanks again, guys.
 
#40
I'm getting kickstarted on making my own snuff this week and it seems way simpler than trying to make palatable pipe tobacco...although I'm trying that too.
I'm using air-cured leaves from last year's crop and I'm in the middle of grinding the dried leaves, but I've been very cautious about the next step(s), unsure of the next step. This thread is a great jumping off point. Thanks again, guys.
If you DO a Kickstarter project let us know!