Brown Sugar Flake and Paneled Pipes, a Physical Dissertation

MakDragon

Optimistic Curmudgeon
Patron
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Fascinating.

So do you think a somewhat irregular shape like a Tetragonal Pentagonal Dodecahedron (TPD) would be better than, say, a Deltoidal Hexecontahedron (DH)?

While obviously a DH has more panels it would seem that the relative thickness and thinnesss of various chamber-adjacent portions of the TPD would allow for more convection currents?

Has anyone considered drilling the draft octagonally, rather than round? Again it would seem this may potentially increase heat and pressure in the pre-combustion zone, thus further enhancing BSF?

Sorry if these questions seem naive or uniformed, I'm no rocket scientist.
Thank you. Now my head hurts.....
 

Hemlock

Well-known member
Much has been noted over the past days about the unique compatibility of the newly re-released Brown Sugar Flake and Paneled Pipes, specifically.

As some of you might know, I have a Master's degree in aerodynamics and heat transfer and I've been thinking more about why a paneled pipe appears necessary for smoking brown sugar flake. Sounds crazy, but there might actually be something to it.

One of the effects that you get with a paneled pipe is that the wall thickness is highly variable compared to a non-paneled pipe. The chamber is a constant diameter and the walls around the chamber are flat, meaning that there is much less briar between the outside and inside of the pipe in the middle of the panels and more briar on the corners in between panels. This means that there are differences in the heat transfer rates around the bowl and therefore a pattern of slight circumferential variances in temperature in the bowl of a lit pipe that corresponds to the pattern of the panels.

Normally, temperature variance in a pipe isn't a very good thing, however, for a dense, sweet, traditional flake those minor patterns of temperature variance might actually be benefitial. Why? Well, what do you get when you have temperature variances in a fluid flow? Convection currents! Variance in local temperature in a flow can cause swirling and other off-axis movement. Because the gas flow now wants to move around within those pockets of temperature variance you get increased residence time in the area of the bowl just after the combustion zone. I.e. the hot combustion gas will stay in the pre-combustion area of the chamber for longer than normal.

Note, in jet engine design we usually try to avoid this effect because temperature variance also comes with pressure variances. Pressure variance and induced convention currents can cause losses in performance at best and loss of engine stability at worst. However, pipes don't have turbines in them and aren't producing thrust so that matters a good deal less (Perhaps they should?).

Anyway,

Previous studies on pipe smoking have demonstrated that the majority of the pleasurable flavors you get from pipe smoking actually sublimate into the smoke via pyrolysis in the pre-combustion zone directly below the burning tobacco layer in the chamber. That's where most of the aromatic compounds and perceived sweetness comes from in pipe smoke. Now, especially in a dense flake like Brown Sugar, the more time the smoke has to swirl around the tobacco the more time it has to loosen up the flake and pick up aromatic compounds and moisture from the flake. In fact, this is a unique problem for dense, sticky flakes and part of the reason that they don't burn as well. The amount of physical work and time required for the heat of the combustion to penetrate the dense chunks of flake often exceeds what the lit pipe can provide, requiring many relights. However, greater residence time of the hot gas in the pre-combustion zone could mitigate these problems.

In summary, increased contact time with the gas in the pre-combustion zone induced by temperature variance in the cross section due to the external panels will result in:

1. Flake that is more pre-heated prior to combustion, making it burn more consistently
2. Smoke that contains a high concentration of sweetness and aromatic compounds when it reaches your mouth.

Of course, this temperature variance effect will be more pronounced the higher the heat transfer coefficient of the briar. While briar is a natural material and thus isn't thermally isotropic, I would still expect that increased density would result in better heat transfer.

So, to maximize the BSPP (Brown Sugar/Paneled Pipe) effect you would want the pipe to be free of voids or pits and be made of the best quality, densest briar you could find.

All of this analysis does indeed circle towards the optimized instrument for smoking Brown Sugar Flake being a high quality artisan pipe with Panels. QED.


A question that remains is, how many panels produces the optimum BSPP effect?

That question cannot be answered until we have a lot more data, so I'm going to need you all to smoke more Brown Sugar Flake in a variety of paneled pipes so we can delve deeper into this topic.

Thanks for coming to my TED talk.
Where’s the sign up sheet and will there be samples of BSF for research trial volunteers?
 

Chico

OGS does kind of suck
What if the panels aren't uniform, as with this lovely Comoy's second now on ebay (at an admittedly great price, being unsmoked and not French - someone who is blind to aesthetics should snap it up):

Screenshot 2023-07-06 at 11.20.21 AM.png

 

commonsenseman

Well-known member
I think I just stumbled upon brown sugar nirvana, admittedly somewhat accidentally. Below is my simple 10-step process.

Step 1) Rub out flake quite well, like until your fingers hurt.
Step 2) Let it rest for an hour.
Step 3) Rub it out further. Enough so you're almost down to individual strands of tobacco leaf.
Step 4) Let it rest for another hour.
Step 5) Complete the rubbing out process. By now, it will be fairly dry & will become basically a shag.
Step 6) Load a pipe gently & gingerly. Gravity feed, no tamp. I chose a Savinelli 320KS due to the chamber shape. I knew I needed the correct ratio of bowl height vs bowl diameter. This one has enough surface area to let the old girl breath properly.
Step 7) Let it rest for a minimum of two more hours in the pipe (I did three).
Step 8) Light. Also gently. At least one false light, then once you've used the weight of the tamper to press it down, a true light.
Step 9) Sip it SLOWLY.
Step 10) Nirvana achieved.
 

UpArrow

Well-known member
Sales
I think I just stumbled upon brown sugar nirvana, admittedly somewhat accidentally. Below is my simple 10-step process.

Step 1) Rub out flake quite well, like until your fingers hurt.
Step 2) Let it rest for an hour.
Step 3) Rub it out further. Enough so you're almost down to individual strands of tobacco leaf.
Step 4) Let it rest for another hour.
Step 5) Complete the rubbing out process. By now, it will be fairly dry & will become basically a shag.
Step 6) Load a pipe gently & gingerly. Gravity feed, no tamp. I chose a Savinelli 320KS due to the chamber shape. I knew I needed the correct ratio of bowl height vs bowl diameter. This one has enough surface area to let the old girl breath properly.
Step 7) Let it rest for a minimum of two more hours in the pipe (I did three).
Step 8) Light. Also gently. At least one false light, then once you've used the weight of the tamper to press it down, a true light.
Step 9) Sip it SLOWLY.
Step 10) Nirvana achieved.

Not as elegant as my meat tenderizer method but I do give you points for sustained effort
 

Ozark Wizard

Well-known member
Patron
Sales
Old Ted Award
I think I just stumbled upon brown sugar nirvana, admittedly somewhat accidentally. Below is my simple 10-step process.

Step 1) Rub out flake quite well, like until your fingers hurt.
Step 2) Let it rest for an hour.
Step 3) Rub it out further. Enough so you're almost down to individual strands of tobacco leaf.
Step 4) Let it rest for another hour.
Step 5) Complete the rubbing out process. By now, it will be fairly dry & will become basically a shag.
Step 6) Load a pipe gently & gingerly. Gravity feed, no tamp. I chose a Savinelli 320KS due to the chamber shape. I knew I needed the correct ratio of bowl height vs bowl diameter. This one has enough surface area to let the old girl breath properly.
Step 7) Let it rest for a minimum of two more hours in the pipe (I did three).
Step 8) Light. Also gently. At least one false light, then once you've used the weight of the tamper to press it down, a true light.
Step 9) Sip it SLOWLY.
Step 10) Nirvana achieved.
No, no, no, quite wrong.......

Open the gates!

download (4).jpeg
 

Condor

Well-known member
Yeah, thanks for the essay but I smoke this blend fine in any pipe without a masters in aerodynamics and heat transfer.

give me a break.
😂Well Peter , let me say this , I have two law degrees ( JD and LLM ) , so I know how this actually works ! I would smoke my Paneled Pipe in the Lovely paneled walled conference room , with paneled Bookcase , mahogany paneled ice box door , and write with my ebony paneled Mont Blanc pen …why ? Because my paneled pipe would look good in this paneled environment … and looking good with a pipe outweighs anything including if it smokes well . Clinching a poor smoking paneled pipe with what ever tobacco just looks great ! It means something .. you are making a statement !… and looking good means everything !
 
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