Bulldog rings

JasonMD

Member
Really enjoy the PSD discussions, not always commenting but always entertained and educated at the same time. My food for thought pertains to the Bulldog, what are the reasons annd origins for the rings around the upper portion of the bowl, many variations but all with rings. Are these heat sinks in purpose or just a design note for aesthetics?
 

Attachments

  • 07B66DEA-DCF0-4734-8955-412D2E92F253.jpeg
    07B66DEA-DCF0-4734-8955-412D2E92F253.jpeg
    21.8 KB · Views: 16

xrundog

Old Pipe Dude
Sales
My theory: it’s called the bead or bead line. The original shape in the 19th century had actual beads carved at the transition line for ornamentation. The beads were pretty quickly sacrificed for expedience in favor of the double line. If you’ve seen the shape without the lines…it doesn’t look right.
 

blackmouth210

Friendly Misanthrope
Patron
My theory: it’s called the bead or bead line. The original shape in the 19th century had actual beads carved at the transition line for ornamentation. The beads were pretty quickly sacrificed for expedience in favor of the double line. If you’ve seen the shape without the lines…it doesn’t look right.

Great info. Thanks for that.

As far as the looks without the lines, it's all subjective. I own at least a couple of Rhodesian/Bulldogs without the lines and they don't look bad at all IMO.
 

Russ H.

Mr. Fruity Pebbles
The aesthetic of the Bulldog simply doesn't work without the bead line(s). I like to see two lines. Also a sandblasted bottom, or rusticated with a smooth top to add aesthetics into the mix where the lines break the top, and bottom, I also see some more modern takes on the shape that appeal to me, but the original Bulldog shape with the bead lines is another timeless shape.
 

Green Drake

Well-known member
Patron
I think it was for aesthetics, you have the curved lower portion and then the taper at the top of the bowl is flat, the lines are at the transition. Also, I wonder if the grooves or beading don’t help to break up the line a bit and hide any imperfections?
 

Maddis

Well-known member
Sales
It's a convention. But it also "works" because it simultaneously softens an edge and defines an intersection. Where do you create the intersection otherwise? Theoretically it becomes so thin it's razor sharp and prone to break. On the other hand, soften it too much and it looks unfinished. If that weren't enough of a reason for the beads, to get the shape in harmony top to bottom without them is no small feat - witness that Nording, it looks OK, but not great. The lines allow the maker to "cheat" the intersection if they want to, placing the beads above or below the widest point.
 

LoneWanderer

Well-known member
I have a Dunhill 5108 in black sandblast without the lines. I’m not a Dunhill expert by a long shot so there may be a good reason for this, but my educated guess is that the lines simply get lost - or show dirt and gunk more readily - with the dark black stain and so they simply didn’t bother, or perhaps (and more likely) they’d just look weird and out of place with the blast finish. Looking at some smooth examples of the 5108, these do seem to have the lines. Funny enough I never even noticed this before just now. I do like the aesthetic of the lines, personally. Never knew about the history with the beads so nice to learn about that!

04E100BB-5D97-498A-A4A1-C5FF0F9E3273.jpeg
 

LoneWanderer

Well-known member
I think Savinelli’s 673 shape is a great example without the line. It isn’t among their most popular shapes for no reason. Some models they have the line, but most don’t

View attachment 170960
Looking at this I’m further inclined to think the lack of lines on blasted or rusticated bulldogs is intentional for preserving the aesthetic of the blast.
 
Top Bottom