Butane Lighter Purging

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
#2
Technically speaking you don't have to "purge" anything -- you are letting out butane and allowing things to go down to atmo pressure inside the tank.

Then you refill it....

If you skip the "purge" step, hypothetically you are just wasting less butane
 

Yakster

Well-known member
#4
I've found that some lighters I must purge because they fill up with air and won't allow butane to refill the lighter. Other lighters are fine without purging.

Sometimes you can see with a lighter that it starts to light and then the flame blows out. This is a sign that you should purge your lighter because you have good gas pressure, but there's too much air in the tank.

I use one of the adapter tips from my butane can to purge my lighters before refilling them.
 

Mikewood

Well-known member
#5
Too much air in the tank...
That’s seems rather odd.
The butane in the canister is pressurized to many atmospheres and is in liquid form. When you fill a lighter you are moving that liquid butane to the lighter’s tank. You can see it in the liquid state thru the viewport. It has a vapor state above and the lighter draws from the vapor to burn. There isn’t any air buildup as the lighter purges itself when you fill it and when you blow it down on the first light.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
#7
Most all pressurized lighters will eventually get air into the the lighter. A great example can be seen in a clear tank type lighter. Without at least letting this escape the vessel will hold less butane over a continued refilling. I will not begin a contest to argue my point.
How is air going to "escape" the vessel into 1 atm pressure on the outside?

The physics don't work.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
#8
Obviously I am a skeptic of the whole "purging" thing, but as a collector of fine lighters I do have a piece of advice on refilling: put the empty-ish lighter in the fridge before re-filling

Chilling the lighter lets you get more butane into it -- a higher internal pressure before it equalizes with the can.
 

Russ H.

Fight The Good Fight
#11
My goal here was to simply share a little something I use.
I by no means wanted this thread to turn into a whether, or not to kind of thing.
I like purging my lighters--Am I right, am I wrong was never a question I asked, nor presented. I simply was sharing a little tool I use that prevents damaging the valve on the lighter vs using something that may damage the valve if one so chooses to do this with their lighter.
We all have opinions on the way we do things---that's fine. I will say I regret starting this thread as it has created a "do it", or "don't do it" kind of thing.
I by no means want to create confusion.
 

Ozark Wizard

Well-known member
Patron
Old Ted Award Winner
#13
When the butane leaves the lighter, what replaces the space that's left?
I think it's dark matter. Fight me.
Um, okay. En garde!

When the tanks are made, they have atmosphere in them. From the factory. Usually Nitrogen — 78 percent. Oxygen — 21 percent. Argon — 0.93 percent. Carbon dioxide — 0.04 percent.

Any of these could be considered components of Dark Matter, as all have mass. All are produced by solar ejecta or dead stars. It's basically composed of particles that do not absorb, reflect, or emit light, so they cannot be detected by observing electromagnetic radiation. Thus Dark Matter is material that cannot be seen directly.

So, the idea of "emptying out the tank" is kinda funny. Unless you hooked up the lighter to a vacuum, it will only equalize to atmospheric pressure. I do not believe that lighter gas goes "bad".

But hey, if one likes to fidget with their paraphernalia, have at it.

Guess that wasn't much of an argument. You're probably right, the tanks are preloaded with Dark Matter.
 

Sonarman

Well-known member
#15
Um, okay. En garde!

When the tanks are made, they have atmosphere in them. From the factory. Usually Nitrogen — 78 percent. Oxygen — 21 percent. Argon — 0.93 percent. Carbon dioxide — 0.04 percent.

Any of these could be considered components of Dark Matter, as all have mass. All are produced by solar ejecta or dead stars. It's basically composed of particles that do not absorb, reflect, or emit light, so they cannot be detected by observing electromagnetic radiation. Thus Dark Matter is material that cannot be seen directly.

So, the idea of "emptying out the tank" is kinda funny. Unless you hooked up the lighter to a vacuum, it will only equalize to atmospheric pressure. I do not believe that lighter gas goes "bad".

But hey, if one likes to fidget with their paraphernalia, have at it.

Guess that wasn't much of an argument. You're probably right, the tanks are preloaded with Dark Matter.
🤯
 

Marker

Well-known member
#17
Xikar has videos all over youtube showing how to care for their lighters. They purge them. Listen to experts in their field or else you are told by facebook how dumb you are.
Take the first part as a real contribution to this thread.
Take the second part as a personal rant that has nothing to do with the conversation, in true PSD style.
 

WrightwoodJohn

Well-known member
Patron
#19
My goal here was to simply share a little something I use.
I by no means wanted this thread to turn into a whether, or not to kind of thing.
I like purging my lighters--Am I right, am I wrong was never a question I asked, nor presented. I simply was sharing a little tool I use that prevents damaging the valve on the lighter vs using something that may damage the valve if one so chooses to do this with their lighter.
We all have opinions on the way we do things---that's fine. I will say I regret starting this thread as it has created a "do it", or "don't do it" kind of thing.
I by no means want to create confusion.
I have a question about the tool Russ.
I use a golf tee to purge right now, it works just ok. Being wood, I figure it has less of a chance to damage the tube.
The tool you posted looks like it has a metal stem. Does it fit over the tube so it doesn't damage it? Or..?
 

Russ H.

Fight The Good Fight
#20
I have a question about the tool Russ.
I use a golf tee to purge right now, it works just ok. Being wood, I figure it has less of a chance to damage the tube.
The tool you posted looks like it has a metal stem. Does it fit over the tube so it doesn't damage it? Or..?
It fits over the tube with the tool being hollow with two small bleed holes in the tube to allow gas to escape. t's made of brass with a aluminum handle.
It works well for my purposes, and I realize others here feel differently about the actual need for such a tool. To some--it's useless, and not needed. For me I like it.
In my link the seller has sold out of them. I guess I'm not the only idiot to buy one.