Can you recommend cigarillos?

Danish

Well-known member
For a period, some years ago, I often smoked cigarillos during the day. Zino (Davidoff) Mini Cigarillos were then among my favorites as were the Danish Caminante Mini Cigars (actually smaller than Caminante Cigarillos, which are almost cigar size). More affordable and OK cigarillo alternatives, though not of the same quality, were from eg Villiger and Wolsdorf, which I often bought on our monthly visits to our neighbour city in Germany. Now I would only smoke my favorite cigarillos on special occasions, due to a bad mix of lowered income and increased tobacco taxes.
 

Slow Tri

Is it Friday yet?
Villiger Export is very good for the price. Also does not require humidor. I've only had one, the maduro, but it did make me wonder a bit why I bothered with handmades.

I have some Henri Wintermans Cafe Aroma cigarillos. These are smaller, maybe more like you're looking for. Again, also dry cured, so no humidification required for these guys. Has a slight coffee/cream flavor and aroma. They're all right. About the size of cigarettes. I actually do not smoke them often. I tend to not like flavored cigars these days. I keep these in my computer bag in case I get the urge. I usually don't, but honestly they are pretty good and you might like them. They come in a handy little tin.

These are my main two when the weather gets extremely cold.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
Why? If it’s a cigar it can only improve the cigar over time. If it’s more of a cigarette I doubt it will improve.

Parodi / De Nobili are meant to be very dry. They're just about straight Kentucky tobacco.

I could imagine wanting a humidor in, oh, say, the dead of winter, or if you were leaving it in your car in wintertime, to keep the RH above 0%. But you are certainly not going to want to put them in your regular cigar humidor at 60 or 65 or 70
 

Yosemite

Klingon Ambassador to Terra
Patron
I just smoked my first one of these...
It was a quick smoke....no shock there, it's small...cigarette sized...
but not bad tasting... in fact it matches some cheapo, no name cigars I've tried ....
nothing spectacular...no subtle flavors or changing over time but if one feels like a quick smoke and doesn't have more than 10 or 15 minutes?
...not a bad way to spend a free quarter of an hour


IMG_5840.jpgIMG_5842.jpg
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
I just smoked my first one of these...
It was a quick smoke....no shock there, it's small...cigarette sized...
but not bad tasting... in fact it matches some cheapo, no name cigars I've tried ....
nothing spectacular...no subtle flavors or changing over time but if one feels like a quick smoke and doesn't have more than 10 or 15 minutes?
...not a bad way to spend a free quarter of an hour


View attachment 82092View attachment 82093
As far as I can tell, all the General Cigar-made cigarillos taste the same, and Punch are the cheapest ones, so I usually buy Punch :)
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
I have always enjoyed CAOs flavored cigarillos.... moontrance, Eileen's dream, etc
Ymmv
unfortunately CAO flavors are not sold in europe. otherwise, I'd already bought a bunch of them.

The funny thing about cigarillos in germany:
the tobacco tax as well as the vat are much lower on cigars, cigarillos and pipe tobacco than on cigarettes.
the result is that there are lots of pretty decent cigarillos that are cheaper than cigarettes.

that being said: I really don't smoke that much, so the price isn't exactly the most important point when
buying a cigarillo.

that being said: villinger cigarillos are €0.20 a piece compared to flor de selva/cohiba/montecristo € 1.00

Premium pipe tobacco is less than € 0.06 per bowl average.
 

Arkie

Well-known member
I just smoked my first one of these...
It was a quick smoke....no shock there, it's small...cigarette sized...
but not bad tasting... in fact it matches some cheapo, no name cigars I've tried ....
nothing spectacular...no subtle flavors or changing over time but if one feels like a quick smoke and doesn't have more than 10 or 15 minutes?
...not a bad way to spend a free quarter of an hour


View attachment 82092View attachment 82093
+1 for the Hoyo de Monterrey.
 

Chico

Well-known member
unfortunately CAO flavors are not sold in europe. otherwise, I'd already bought a bunch of them.

The funny thing about cigarillos in germany:
the tobacco tax as well as the vat are much lower on cigars, cigarillos and pipe tobacco than on cigarettes.
the result is that there are lots of pretty decent cigarillos that are cheaper than cigarettes.

that being said: I really don't smoke that much, so the price isn't exactly the most important point when
buying a cigarillo.

that being said: villinger cigarillos are €0.20 a piece compared to flor de selva/cohiba/montecristo € 1.00

Premium pipe tobacco is less than € 0.06 per bowl average.
As soon as Covid is over I'm driving to Germany. Not sure if there are decent pipe shops in Portugal - a cigar shop in Lisbon is supposed to be okay. I don't know about prices yet, either.

It's insane that I can take as much tobacco as I want from Germany to another EU country, but buying online at all is verboten.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
As soon as Covid is over I'm driving to Germany. Not sure if there are decent pipe shops in Portugal - a cigar shop in Lisbon is supposed to be okay. I don't know about prices yet, either.

It's insane that I can take as much tobacco as I want from Germany to another EU country, but buying online at all is verboten.
Buying online between countries is determined by your local laws -- tobacco is not part of the common market. So your national legislature in Portugal set that up.

The personal exemption for tobacco you carry yourself was set by Brussels.

The two sets of rules are inconsistent because two different sets of people wrote them!
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Not sure if there are decent pipe shops in Portugal
There is a thread with recommendations from a while ago where a forum member went on a europe round trip.

It's insane that I can take as much tobacco as I want from Germany to another EU country, but buying online at all is verboten.
both statements are incorrect.

a) there are certain amounts of tobacco you can take with you when travelling within the eu, but it is by no means unlimited
if you only take pipe tobacco with you, the amount is currently 1 kg. on flights it's different.

b) online tobacco sales
Buying online between countries is determined by your local laws
that statement is closer to the truth, but not entirely correct.

there are several reasons for tobacco online sales being prohibited:
- in several countries, the shipment of tobacco products to consumers is prohibited. They have to be picked up in person.
- every EU country has their own tobacco tax. When a business sells tobacco products to another eu country, they need to
send the tobacco product that was declared and taxed in the country where it's being sent.
This means: if you buy tobacco directly from a producer (e.g. Dan Pipe/ Motzek/ HU tobacco) they usually have a stock of
tobacco that has been produced for sale in different eu countries, and has been taxed and declared accordingly.
those tobaccos will be available for delivery to that specific country only.
it's also possible for a tobacco sales business to have a "tax free storage unit" and buy several countries tax stamps.
tobacco taxes are paid by buying the tax stamps. Now they can seal the tobacco tins with the right countries tax stamp
before delivery, thus making it legal to sell only to that one country. That's a lot of work (I haven't even started talking
about the paperwork involved), which is the reason you don't really see that kind of thing.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
tobacco is not part of the common market.
that statement is incorrect.

the common market includes any product. but certain products are taxed with so called "consumer taxes",
which have not been harmonized by EU legislation.

This also includes alcohol and coffee taxes.

I believe for alcohol, the local legislation has been harmonized, so sales are no problem. For coffee,
it's mostly the same. the major exception here that I know of are the netherlands: they do not have
a coffee tax, which results in you having to declare any coffee orders you receive from there and pay your
local coffee tax.

most people are unaware of that. it's a "fun fact" you learn when becoming a cpa. for most people, it's not
important, because coffee taxes are low and you will usually not be punished when caught. simply pay the
very low tax and you're done. However not paying your coffee tax is an act of tax avoidance, so as a
cpa you can lose your license for that offense if repeatedly ordering coffee from the netherlands
without proper declaration, even if it's minor. Therefore, they do teach that in school.
 

Chico

Well-known member
There is a thread with recommendations from a while ago where a forum member went on a europe round trip.


both statements are incorrect.

a) there are certain amounts of tobacco you can take with you when travelling within the eu, but it is by no means unlimited
if you only take pipe tobacco with you, the amount is currently 1 kg. on flights it's different.

b) online tobacco sales

that statement is closer to the truth, but not entirely correct.

there are several reasons for tobacco online sales being prohibited:
- in several countries, the shipment of tobacco products to consumers is prohibited. They have to be picked up in person.
- every EU country has their own tobacco tax. When a business sells tobacco products to another eu country, they need to
send the tobacco product that was declared and taxed in the country where it's being sent.
This means: if you buy tobacco directly from a producer (e.g. Dan Pipe/ Motzek/ HU tobacco) they usually have a stock of
tobacco that has been produced for sale in different eu countries, and has been taxed and declared accordingly.
those tobaccos will be available for delivery to that specific country only.
it's also possible for a tobacco sales business to have a "tax free storage unit" and buy several countries tax stamps.
tobacco taxes are paid by buying the tax stamps. Now they can seal the tobacco tins with the right countries tax stamp
before delivery, thus making it legal to sell only to that one country. That's a lot of work (I haven't even started talking
about the paperwork involved), which is the reason you don't really see that kind of thing.
So even if not technically banned, consumers buying tobacco online is in reality not really possible, is that correct?

I didn't realize there were any rules about tobacco or alcohol within the EU. People in the UK certainly didn't abide by them.
 

Greenbriar

Well-known member
I rememberd another one yesterday as I found one in my humidor and brought it to smoke as the shop inspected a leaking tire. Check your local cig shop for a cheap one called Havanah Honeys. There are some flavored ones but I prefer the original. Come in ziploc type packs of 2 I think. If you go on to their website and give them your address or birthdate or something they’ll send you coupons too. They are easy for me to find here, (smoker friendly near me). They do require humidor if you plan on long term storage, but you don’t have to buy a huge box online not knowing if you’ll like them. Much better quality than backwoods or game leaf. Has some real cigar flavor, not like other cheap stuff that mostly tastes like cigs and chemicals with a whisper of cigar. Really good for what they are. I’m surprised I don’t see them mentioned more often here

In addition to tasting good, they have decent construction. Won’t come apart in your mouth immediately, though gets a little loosely goosey at the end if you’re a slobber monkey like me. They have that rugged spaghetti western look but are not the same as those Toscano and copycats
 

The Postman

Well-known member
I just smoked my first one of these...
It was a quick smoke....no shock there, it's small...cigarette sized...
but not bad tasting... in fact it matches some cheapo, no name cigars I've tried ....
nothing spectacular...no subtle flavors or changing over time but if one feels like a quick smoke and doesn't have more than 10 or 15 minutes?
...not a bad way to spend a free quarter of an hour


View attachment 82092View attachment 82093
I was in a cigar shop a couple of weeks ago and I asked the owner if he could recomend a cigarello since I knew nothing about em. My dad likes em when he works in the yard so the gentleman recommended the excalibur ones. Not the ones you have pictured tho. My dad really liked em and the shop owner said he sells more of those than any other cigarello.
 

Tianlin

Well-known member
If I liked Romeo y Julieta Blue Miniatures, what else I can try?
Are there any good cigarillos that do not require a humidor?
I’m not sure if you’re asking for one thing or two. Depending on how I read the questions, either you’re looking for 1) either recommendations that are comparable to the RyJ miniatures you like -or- cigarillos which can be stored long-term without a humidor, or 2) you’re looking for cigarillos which check both of those boxes as a single product.

If what you’re looking for is #2, you’ll probably be best served trying the Ashton small cigars. Unlike the full sized cigars of that brand, they are dry cured and made in Europe, can be stored without a humidor and ought to be mild and tasty. Being Ashton products, I wouldn’t doubt they’re likely of very good quality though I haven’t tried them myself.

Another option might be Villiger Export in the natural wrappers, which I know are great and also dry cured but which are going to be significantly thicker than the RyJs as well as a bit less mild.

For cigarillos comparable in size and taste, I’d say Macanudo Ascots or the Griffin’s Griffinos are both good options, but if you don’t have a humidor I wouldn’t personally buy more than a tin at a time. If you order a few tins online though you’ll likely receive them in a heavy plastic bag with a mini boveda pouch so it may be okay. Anyway, those are both small and very mild, and I’d say if you like the RyJs they’re probably even a step up. Also good are Sancho Panza Matadors, but they’re a little more medium than mild. Still, anything that slim can only be so mild anyway.

If you’re fine with something very different than the RyJs, then the Italian or Italian-style dry cured cigars some folks are recommending are almost uniformly very good products, though also very strong in flavor and generally pretty high in nicotine. They are in no way comparable to what you mentioned liking, but they are good and shouldn’t be stored in a humidor so they definitely meet that criteria if you’re good with something that only checks one of those boxes.

You also might try some cheap machine made cigarillos readily available at gas stations and convenience stores. Some folks love them and some really don’t, but if it turns out that you enjoy a White Owl or Swisher Sweet or something just fine, you’d be pretty lucky in being able to just go pick a couple up whenever you wanted without a need to worry about fancy storage or high prices. Dutch Masters, Garcia y Vega and Antonio y Cleopatra (often referred to by the name of their most popular size, Grenadiers) all use natural wrappers rather than homogenized if that is important to you. So do Backwoods, and I think they don’t even use a homogenized binder though I never loved them myself. They have some dyed in the wool fans, though. Anyway there are a lot of good recommendations in the thread, so if you have the money try whatever sounds best!