Cigar Leaf

SwedeFP

Well-known member
Cuban Mixture is one of my favorite blends, though I think the cigar leaf’s presence is pretty subdued. Hearth and Home’s Virginia Spice and John Patton’s Storm Front are the other two CL blends that I cellar and enjoy. If I had to rate those three it would be in that order. Am I correct in believing that “cigar leaf” is flue-cured burley?
Some of what I've seen used for cigars was what is called dark air cured aka one sucker. I think this can be used as cigar filler or binder-maybe wrapper. I'll take some local leaf grown by county tobacco farmers straight from the barn, and add it to any tobacco I want to add strength to like Prince Albert. It gives a nice cigar note and boosts the nicotine too.
 

Hollis

Well-known member
Patron
I've smoked a few bowls of Warped Until the End but it didn't take either. I think I'll probably just smoke a cigar next time I get a hankering.
 

Pipepunk

Well-known member
Sales
McClelland Dominican Glory Maduro as suggested by @SonoranHotDog is outstanding....I have only a few tins of this left. I will add C&D Mad Fiddler Flake...great blend and it's readily available!
:thumb-yello:
Absolutely loved Dominican glory both Maduro and the other version still have a couple tins one open and 1 unopened holding on to those for dear life.would love to encounter an aromatic bulk or tinned that has cigar leaf.if not like Dominican at least something in the same general ballpark
 

norniron

Well-known member
The cigar leaf blend that always captured my imagination, although it was discontinued while I was
still at school, was the old Dunhill Cuba mixture. It was a cigar leaf blend that Dunhill brought out in
1912, at the same time as Royal Yacht. Along with other Dunhill tobaccos, it was supplied to troops
fighting on the Western Front in the Great War, a conflict I have a great interest in.
Cuba was discontinued in the sixties, largely as a consequence of the American embargo on products
from Cuba, the US being a major market for Dunhill.
When I did start smoking a pipe, one of the tobaccos recommended to me was James Fox Bankers Mixture,
precisely because it contained Havana leaf and I had smoked cigars for some years. It wasn't bad but I never
really made the cigar connection.
 

UpArrow

Well-known member
Sales
The Match Victorian I received 8 weeks ago has a rather irritating top note of butterscotch. Very annoying if one’s expectation is that it will mimic Elizabethan to some degree.
After some thought I added ~5% Sutliff cigar leaf to it which countered that note very successfully. Then added some dark birdseye and it’s a very good smoke that I look forward to.
 

Chicken Man

Keep It Simple
Patron
The cigar leaf blend that always captured my imagination, although it was discontinued while I was
still at school, was the old Dunhill Cuba mixture. It was a cigar leaf blend that Dunhill brought out in
1912, at the same time as Royal Yacht. Along with other Dunhill tobaccos, it was supplied to troops
fighting on the Western Front in the Great War, a conflict I have a great interest in.
Cuba was discontinued in the sixties, largely as a consequence of the American embargo on products
from Cuba, the US being a major market for Dunhill.
When I did start smoking a pipe, one of the tobaccos recommended to me was James Fox Bankers Mixture,
precisely because it contained Havana leaf and I had smoked cigars for some years. It wasn't bad but I never
really made the cigar connection.
I enjoy Banker's, however I don't really get much of a cigar flavour or mouth feel either. I've only smoked a few cigars but it doesn't remind of them at all. I have read a couple of reviews where people have claimed that the blend used to contain more cigar leaf, but I cannot verify whether that is true or not.
 

Chicken Man

Keep It Simple
Patron
I did not mean that the tobacco did not taste like a cigar, what I meant was that I did not get any notes or flavours of cigar leaf, or the "texture" associated with it. I think you described the texture of a cigar leaf blend well:
I think cigar leaf gives a blend strength and "body" -- words like "robust" and "thick" are often used in reviews of these blends.

I'm not sure if it is an opinion shared by many people, but I would like a cigar leaf blend that does taste like a cigar. I am aware that most people would tell me to just smoke a cigar, however I do prefer the form factor of pipes over cigars. I have had success with breaking up cigars and putting them in pipes on one or two occasions. Samuel Gawith Brown No.4, despite containing no cigar leaf, does have a kind of cigar taste for me, but I need to smoke more to see if it will fit that niche in my rotation. Unfortunately, my access to cigar leaf blends is very limited, I think Banker's might be the only one, though I'm not certain.
 

SomebodyElse

Active member
I do like me some GLP key largo. I’ve got a recent 8 oz can aging in a ball jar. It for sure is better the longer it sits. It’s a “cant lose” cellar blend
I've been going through a tin of this for about a month. I am enjoying it but I keep wondering what it would be like in a couple years. It feels like some time to meld would really make it shine. With probably just under an ounce left I'm tempted to jar it up and let it sit for a while.
 
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