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Cornell & Diehl Carolina Red Flake 2018

Cheeseybacon

Well-known member
#21
Great review. Interesting that you got good results in a wide bowl, but then again it IS a C&D blend. Many of theirs are great with room to breathe.
Honestly, as time goes on, I am slowly starting to note that many Virginia/VaPer blends can benefit from the wider bowls, not just this blend. Conventional wisdom states that English blends have the most to benefit from a wider bowl, given the increased surface area allows more of the different types of tobacco to more easily burn simultaneously. While that is indeed true, many Virginia blends are also often composed of multiple variants of Virginia, meaning the increased surface area of a wide bowl can provide a similar (if somewhat less contrasting) benefit to a Virginia blend, providing of course that said Virginia blend isn't too monochromatic in terms of the Virginias varietals that are used. Granted, one also needs to be additionally more cautious with cadence when enjoying a Virginia blend in a wide bowl

In regard to C&D specifically, the other thing I'll say is, and mind you I have ZERO proof to back up this claim, it's just my own paranoid suspicion talking here, I think they spike a lot of their blends with a touch Burley, even if the blend isn't listed as having it. Still undecided if CRF18 falls into this cstrgory.
 

tfdickson

Well-known member
Sales
Patron
#22
Honestly, as time goes on, I am slowly starting to note that many Virginia/VaPer blends can benefit from the wider bowls, not just this blend. Conventional wisdom states that English blends have the most to benefit from a wider bowl, given the increased surface area allows more of the different types of tobacco to more easily burn simultaneously. While that is indeed true, many Virginia blends are also often composed of multiple variants of Virginia, meaning the increased surface area of a wide bowl can provide a similar (if somewhat less contrasting) benefit to a Virginia blend, providing of course that said Virginia blend isn't too monochromatic in terms of the Virginias varietals that are used. Granted, one also needs to be additionally more cautious with cadence when enjoying a Virginia blend in a wide bowl

In regard to C&D specifically, the other thing I'll say is, and mind you I have ZERO proof to back up this claim, it's just my own paranoid suspicion talking here, I think they spike a lot of their blends with a touch Burley, even if the blend isn't listed as having it. Still undecided if CRF18 falls into this cstrgory.
Like Yogi Berra said, “You can observe a lot by just watching.”
 

JustScott

Well-known member
#23
In regard to C&D specifically, the other thing I'll say is, and mind you I have ZERO proof to back up this claim, it's just my own paranoid suspicion talking here, I think they spike a lot of their blends with a touch Burley, even if the blend isn't listed as having it. Still undecided if CRF18 falls into this cstrgory.
That seems a definite possibility to me. I have noticed a similar thing, but I filed it under "blender palette." Like if you've smoked a good amount of Mac Baren you would likely be able to pick out a MB blend, or the "Germain's taste", etc. I can't remember who said it, but I think it was on the old site, that a McClelland burley tasted a bit VA-y and that a C&D VA tasted a little burley-ish.
 

SmokeRings

Well-known member
#24
That seems a definite possibility to me. I have noticed a similar thing, but I filed it under "blender palette." Like if you've smoked a good amount of Mac Baren you would likely be able to pick out a MB blend, or the "Germain's taste", etc. I can't remember who said it, but I think it was on the old site, that a McClelland burley tasted a bit VA-y and that a C&D VA tasted a little burley-ish.
If they use the same equipment to process the tobacco's it is exceedingly likely that there will be some taste crossover...the oils and moisture off of burley blends getting onto the presses and shredders and then "contaminating" the virginias and so on...since C&D does so much with burley it would stand to reason that much of their stuff has an Eau De Burley going on.
 

JustScott

Well-known member
#25
If they use the same equipment to process the tobacco's it is exceedingly likely that there will be some taste crossover...the oils and moisture off of burley blends getting onto the presses and shredders and then "contaminating" the virginias and so on...since C&D does so much with burley it would stand to reason that much of their stuff has an Eau De Burley going on.
Ahh, kind of like how pretty much everything from GH&Co have that tiny little bit of "sauce" if you concentrate. That makes sense.
 

Adam Bybee

Well-known member
#26
Very good original review. I'd have to agree with you on it on almost all points. Compared to just about any other Virginia flake, I found this one to be almost shockingly dry and earthy. Lots of dark toasted bread and some nutty flavors and an ever-present spicy edge to it. I was able to coax out some richer notes in a larger pipe, particularly towards the end of the bowl but if I was smoking this as a blind review I would have sworn that this had a good proportion of burley or dry Orientals in there. As some others have mused, it's possible that most other highly regarded Virginia blends rely on some extra processing and casing to make them as sweet and pleasant as they are. In which case I say, case away!

This really surprised me, particularly after reading heaps of glowing reviews from the original few releases of this blend about how similar it was to other vaunted sweet red Virginias. I'm going to jar up the rest for now and let 'er sit for a while.
 

Adam Bybee

Well-known member
#27
An interesting tidbit. These tins state that the sugar content of this blend is 10.49%.

On a recent episode of Pipes Mag. Radio, Mike McNiel was discussing their history with blending red virginas and dropped a quick side comment that the batches of virginia they were working with had 23-24% sugar content (if I recall his comment correctly). If that is the case, then that's a pretty eye opening statement.
 

tfdickson

Well-known member
Sales
Patron
#29
An interesting tidbit. These tins state that the sugar content of this blend is 10.49%.

On a recent episode of Pipes Mag. Radio, Mike McNiel was discussing their history with blending red virginas and dropped a quick side comment that the batches of virginia they were working with had 23-24% sugar content (if I recall his comment correctly). If that is the case, then that's a pretty eye opening statement.
Fascinating, that would explain a lot of true. For what it’s worth BAT says that VA’s natural sugar content ranges from 5-25%.

http://www.bat-science.com/groupms/sites/BAT_9GVJXS.nsf/vwPagesWebLive/DO7AXG65