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Crazy eBayers

Adam Bybee

Well-known member
Sales
#25
This is more of a personal pet peeve than anything, but the ebay seller "great-estate-pipes" (who is awesome, by the way) frequently puts the phrase "VERY MINT!" on the beginning of his listings.

"Mintness" does not admit of degrees. It's a yes or no property which describes whether a product has been changed in any way since the date of manufacture. Something cannot be "very mint", "sorta mint", "57% mint", etc. It's either mint or it ain't. So...does that mean that his mint pipes are somehow less perfect than the very mint ones? What does mint actually mean then in the pipe context? If a pipe has been touched or buffed since it left the factory is it no longer mint?

It's just another one of those silly ebay buzz words that doesn't actually mean anything other than "I want you to believe that this item is valuable".
 

JustScott

Well-known member
#27
This is more of a personal pet peeve than anything, but the ebay seller "great-estate-pipes" (who is awesome, by the way) frequently puts the phrase "VERY MINT!" on the beginning of his listings.

"Mintness" does not admit of degrees. It's a yes or no property which describes whether a product has been changed in any way since the date of manufacture. Something cannot be "very mint", "sorta mint", "57% mint", etc. It's either mint or it ain't. So...does that mean that his mint pipes are somehow less perfect than the very mint ones? What does mint actually mean then in the pipe context? If a pipe has been touched or buffed since it left the factory is it no longer mint?

It's just another one of those silly ebay buzz words that doesn't actually mean anything other than "I want you to believe that this item is valuable".
Maybe he cleans them with peppermint-oil-dipped cleaners, and he means "very minty."
 

MadEel76

Well-known member
Patron
#28
This is more of a personal pet peeve than anything, but the ebay seller "great-estate-pipes" (who is awesome, by the way) frequently puts the phrase "VERY MINT!" on the beginning of his listings.

"Mintness" does not admit of degrees. It's a yes or no property which describes whether a product has been changed in any way since the date of manufacture. Something cannot be "very mint", "sorta mint", "57% mint", etc. It's either mint or it ain't. So...does that mean that his mint pipes are somehow less perfect than the very mint ones? What does mint actually mean then in the pipe context? If a pipe has been touched or buffed since it left the factory is it no longer mint?

It's just another one of those silly ebay buzz words that doesn't actually mean anything other than "I want you to believe that this item is valuable".
Very pregnant.
 

Yosemite

Well-known member
#29
I personally hate antique and classic..... too many people are now convinced any car over 25 is a classic ...no,no and hell no!.... I don't care how old a Pinto gets....it's not a classic....classic means far more than age.....once upon a time a 1933 Cadillac wasn't classic if it was a V8...it had to be a V12 or V16 ....it has to have been something beyond the dull,pedestrianl when it was new... there was a time when absolutely no post war cars were called classic....milestone car was used by one of the old established car clubs for extraordinary postwar cars ...and very few qualified...a 1955 Nomad was in but no other 55 Chevy.... I refuse to call my 1956 Beetles classic....vintage bug?yes,old bug? yes, classic?...NOPE..... and antique required over 100 years....now I see people using antique in pipe ads for ones made in the 1970's.....right....I'm not a fat old man....I was produced in 1967,I'm an antique........ that and "bakelite"......not every kind of plastic is bakelite UHG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!....ok,rant over....go smoke a bowl of something in a classic pipe with a bakelite stem streaming netflix on an antique 1973 tv....
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
#31
I know this sounds crazy, but a guy I know saw a picture of his own excavator on ebay. He informed the police, had a friend buy it and the police ready. sure enough, the day after the
auction ended, 2 guys showed up at 2 a.m. to steal his excavator. That's a lot of luck to stumble across something like that... he'd been looking for some tools for the thing when he
saw the pic.

Guys were arrested and he's since built a garage for the thing... obviously doesn't want to bet on his luck again.
 

JustScott

Well-known member
#32
I know this sounds crazy, but a guy I know saw a picture of his own excavator on ebay. He informed the police, had a friend buy it and the police ready. sure enough, the day after the
auction ended, 2 guys showed up at 2 a.m. to steal his excavator. That's a lot of luck to stumble across something like that... he'd been looking for some tools for the thing when he
saw the pic.

Guys were arrested and he's since built a garage for the thing... obviously doesn't want to bet on his luck again.
I've heard of similar things happening, but usually it's just the picture that gets stolen here. On a motorcycle forum I used to be a part of, there were several people who found pics of their bike for sale (usually on craigslist), supposedly located somewhere else etc. The people steal a pic, "sell" it, accept payment, and some will even send a fake shipping invoice. Others just disappear as soon as they have the money. I haven't heard of anyone actually trying to steal the item they are "selling". You could almost call that a good work ethic. Almost...
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
#33
I haven't heard of anyone actually trying to steal the item they are "selling". You could almost call that a good work ethic. Almost...
well we're close to eastern europe so it's actually not that uncommon for things like this to happen. At least you do hear such things on the news on a regular basis. It actually
happening to someone you know is a different story.

Any licensed vehicle is very difficult, because it is easy to identify the actual owner. anything that doesn't require a license plate however... carfull where you park it.
 
C

Cap'n Terrible

Guest
#34
You guys ever get weird messages on ebay? I myself have tried to message and help guys with incorrect info in a polite way.
A little while ago I thought I'd let an ebay seller know that the item he had listed as a pipe stand was in fact a replica of a Shang dynasty ritual wine cup. He took my correction well and said he would correct his description. But after thinking it over it occurred to me that it would indeed Shang Dynasty Pipe Stand.PNG make a very interesting and unusual pipe stand for, of course, a large and impressive pipe and I've since ordered one!

Shang Dynasty Pipe Stand.PNG
 
C

Cap'n Terrible

Guest
#35
You could give him the pipe but charge $150.00 for shipping.
That isn't as funny as it sounds. There are swine active on ebay doings things not too far from that and ebay shipping prices are shown in a rather small and inconspicuous font. It's easy to overlook what you are eventually going to have to pay when shipping is added.

Who was it that said "Let the buyer beware!"?
 
C

Cap'n Terrible

Guest
#36
that's what for you.

I seen a falcon pipe on eBay a few months ago, beat to hell looked like it had never seen a pipe cleaner in its life, but I was fancying a restoration project...the price £200.

I messaged the seller and politely told him that brand new falcons sell for around the £35 Mark, but is there some pominance to the owner ship of this pipe and if so is there any proof, and would it be possible to work something out.

an hour or so later I got a message that conveyed extreme hysterics, how dare I message him and ask such things, the pipe is silver so therefore is a precious metal, it is over 100 years old and was her grandads so the sentimental value is conveyed in the price and what do I know I'm just an ebayer and know nothing about pipes.

I must say I did lose it a bit in my reply, which went somethig of the foloowing.

thank you ever so much for your very [un]polite reply but here is a few tips for you.

1. the metal is indeed silver but not of the precious sort because it is aluminium, if aluminium was so precious anyone who owns a roll of aluminium foil would never have to work.

2. it isn't over a hundred years old as falcons where only invented in the 30s

3. good look selling something that looks like it has been through every battle in world war 2 for nearly 10 times the asking price for the same thing brand new.

funny enough no reply.
This is funny. :roflmao:
 
C

Cap'n Terrible

Guest
#37
Chancers, chancers everywhere. I see quite a number of eBay listings along the lines of 'rare and unusual smoking pipe, which in their minds is how one usually goes about listing a basket pipe with a hole chewed through the stem and oxidation thicker than mud. Some of it is no doubt ignorance but I truly believe the vast majority of these are dishonest sellers. First I have heard of somebody asking for a listing for FREE though. That's next level lunatic.
And what about all those listings of cheap mass-manufactured plastic crap for stuff being described as "Vintage"? It really messes up Search Lists if you are looking for something that is actually Vintage.
 

Retrogasm

Active member
#39
This is more of a personal pet peeve than anything, but the ebay seller "great-estate-pipes" (who is awesome, by the way) frequently puts the phrase "VERY MINT!" on the beginning of his listings.

"Mintness" does not admit of degrees. It's a yes or no property which describes whether a product has been changed in any way since the date of manufacture. Something cannot be "very mint", "sorta mint", "57% mint", etc. It's either mint or it ain't. So...does that mean that his mint pipes are somehow less perfect than the very mint ones? What does mint actually mean then in the pipe context? If a pipe has been touched or buffed since it left the factory is it no longer mint?

It's just another one of those silly ebay buzz words that doesn't actually mean anything other than "I want you to believe that this item is valuable".
The pipe business doesn't have a system of grading like they do in other collector areas like say for instance stamps, comics or vinyl records, which leads to these kinds of misuses of terms. Basically, these words mean whatever the seller wants them to mean. I usually disregard them all and simply go by what I can see in the pictures; if I can't see it, no amount of ad copy is going to persuade me that it's there.
 

Coastal Bend

Get off my lawn.
Patron
#40
This is slightly off-topic from "Crazy eBayers," but I thought better here than opening a whole new thread.

In a moment of temporary insanity I did a search for Cellini pipes. Don't know why, just did. Found one that I liked. It was a Buy it Now and I did. The price was good, but the shipping was a little pricey -- almost 10-bucks.

This "expected delivery" listed was a date range from one to two weeks out. I posted a cordial note to the seller saying that since I paid a fairly decent shipping fee why the extended delivery estimate? (I didn't whine about the amount of the shipping fee, just noted that 2-day USPS shipping for a pipe should be more than covered by the amount I paid.)

I got a quick response -- which is nice -- that eBay has had issues with the shipping area since they "changed their look." The seller said they usually ship for three-day delivery.

The unexpected perk was a note a few moments later saying my account had been refunded $4, the pipe was on the way and being shipped with three-day delivery. I thought that was a nice ending.

Now I'll wait to see if my purchase is a bust or a bonanza. At any rate, I think I was treated well.