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Dating a Dunhill without a date stamp?

#1
I've been perusing the internet Dunhill dating sites but have yet to come across an answer as to how to potentially date this pipe. To me it looks like an "L" where most typically there is a #. Has anyone seen anything like this, any thoughts on where to look for more info? Thanks!

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blackmouth210

Well-known member
#9
Are the letters usually different sizes, or am I seeing something odd because of the picture. The letters in the "LAND" part of the stamp look bigger.
I see it too.
The "England" looks off.
And I swear I can see the remnants of a 4 after the D on England. Just at the one o'clock position towards the "n" above it.
This would date it at 1964.

That "L" shaped marking doesn't look much like it came from a stamp IMO.
 
#10
Well my guy says that it's hard to tell from the photo but that may be a wonky underlined 1, which would make it a '61. If it's an L it is a mystery.
That's it, a 1 with an underline! Your guy was spot on. Or should I say, white spot on :hahaha-024:

Thanks again for the help. In the future I will endeavor to look at things a little more carefully before running to the boards.
 

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
Patron
#12
I waited to chime in on this matter, and here is my opinion:
First, and foremost--the "L"---This is totally amiss. The "L' designation on a Dunhill pipe denotes a regulator device that would have been made into the pipe during factory production.
Also the stamping is a bit sketchy. This pipe as far as the "L"--its way too big for a normal Dunhill stamping if the pipe in fact was equipped with a regulator device--and this one clearly is not.
The pipe itself leaves more questions than answers, and I for one believe it has been messed with.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
#13
I waited to chime in on this matter, and here is my opinion:
First, and foremost--the "L"---This is totally amiss. The "L' designation on a Dunhill pipe denotes a regulator device that would have been made into the pipe during factory production.
Also the stamping is a bit sketchy. This pipe as far as the "L"--its way too big for a normal Dunhill stamping if the pipe in fact was equipped with a regulator device--and this one clearly is not.
The pipe itself leaves more questions than answers, and I for one believe it has been messed with.
What is the Dunhill "regulator" signified by an 'L' ?
 

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
Patron
#14
I went through printed information I have--I had to dig. The Loring pages, and history I have shows that Dunhill, and I am unsure of the years, but in the early 1960's they made afew pipes using what I call a gimmick known as a regulator. Other pipe makers of the time also offered this device incorperated into their pipes as a sales gimmick--note I use the word "gimmick", but others may choose a better lesss offensive term. The device would be called a carburetor. The device was used to regulate air into the bowl. I do nor have any pictures of how Dunhill used, or made the device into their pipes.
Keep in mind that this is the information I have found, and I had to dig through some printed information I had put away in a binder from years past. I know we discussed the "L" stamping on Dunhill pipes before, and it ate at me about that stupid letter "L". I had to dig deep, but the Loring information I found shows the "L" designation as being a pipe with a regulating device in it. NOW----keep in mind that this information is what I found. It is information from the Loring history about Dunhill.
I am still a little on the fence about the way the word 'England" is stamped. It looks a bit suspect, but through time there had been stamping variations, and I would again need to dig through my stuff to see some pictures, and examples of pipes near the year of 1961.
The fact the stamping appears as it does could even be from how the stamp, and pipe shank were positioned during the striking of the pipe. Anything is possible. I looked at the picture in this thread, and I as many am greatly intrigued.
 

ShilohHollow

Anchors Aweigh
Staff member
Sales
#15
I went through printed information I have--I had to dig. The Loring pages, and history I have shows that Dunhill, and I am unsure of the years, but in the early 1960's they made afew pipes using what I call a gimmick known as a regulator. Other pipe makers of the time also offered this device incorperated into their pipes as a sales gimmick--note I use the word "gimmick", but others may choose a better lesss offensive term. The device would be called a carburetor. The device was used to regulate air into the bowl. I do nor have any pictures of how Dunhill used, or made the device into their pipes.
Keep in mind that this is the information I have found, and I had to dig through some printed information I had put away in a binder from years past. I know we discussed the "L" stamping on Dunhill pipes before, and it ate at me about that stupid letter "L". I had to dig deep, but the Loring information I found shows the "L" designation as being a pipe with a regulating device in it. NOW----keep in mind that this information is what I found. It is information from the Loring history about Dunhill.
I am still a little on the fence about the way the word 'England" is stamped. It looks a bit suspect, but through time there had been stamping variations, and I would again need to dig through my stuff to see some pictures, and examples of pipes near the year of 1961.
The fact the stamping appears as it does could even be from how the stamp, and pipe shank were positioned during the striking of the pipe. Anything is possible. I looked at the picture in this thread, and I as many am greatly intrigued.
That would be the Dunhill Airstream, but I've not seen one of those with an L marking, though I haven't seen everything either...
 

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
Patron
#16
Like I say--keep in mind the information I found is only as accurate as it's original writer. I on a personal level have to refer many times to information--I have forgotten much of the stuff I once knew. I feel kinda sad about that, but I have long forgotten much of the history I studued on certain pipes. I often refer to papers I printed off through the years. Much of that I have lost also.
 
#20
Thanks everyone for all your responses and input. This is the first Dunhill I have touched, and certainly the first I have purchased (although perhaps it may be that I have in fact yet to purchase an authentic one as this investigation is ongoing now, TBD!), so I have 0 (zero) experience with them. I have had this pipe for a couple of years, I think it came in the initial wave of estate pipes that I purchased when my estate PAD was slightly out of control. I got it because I liked the shape, then put it up in the cabinet with the thought of sending it off to professionally refurbished. I had actually kind of forgotten about it, but was inspired to pull it out after reading the "Mr. Pickwick/Sasieni" restoration thread. I wanted to get it sent off, but thought it might be fun to date it first.
In any case now I have spent some time down the Dunhill internet rabbit hole and it has been fascinating, I hope to continue to learn more about them and, of course, this pipe in particular.
I apologize in advance for my photography skills, I'm just using my phone camera.

For clarification I no longer think the "L" is an L. With some better lighting and magnification the vertical and horizontal lines do not appear to connect. So perhaps an underlined 1 as @Spillproof's muc appreciated source suggested.
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