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Do Smooth Savinellis Have Fills?

Maddis

Sales
Sales
#21
IMG_6212.jpg

Some anecdotal data. This is a random $25 block of briar. Or it could be, say, a $15-$20 block if you buy a few thousand at a time like a larger scale manufacturer could. Would this "good" a block be used on a smooth pipe that ultimately had a retail price of $200? I don't know, but I would guess not. Still, let's assume this is representative of the quality block that would go into a $200 smooth pipe from a larger production company like SAV or Pete. The larger flaw with the arrow pointed to it is a smaller version of something I was chasing away. The smaller circled one is a new story emerging from the chase. Who knows what the next chapter is? ----> This block is full of "flaws." I don't like thinking of them with that terminology, but whatever you call them, they're everywhere.

This is one big advantage of drilling after shaping btw, but that's definitely not happening with the pipes we're talking about.
 

Bernie Rain

Well-known member
#24
I don’t believe there are any fills in brylon pipes. Just in case that’s important to you.
Nice irony, or perhaps sarcasm is a more fitting term - but:
It is totally legit expecting a smooth pipe to be fill-free, at least in my opinion.
I do not think that somebody here is as arrogant as to say: "Throw the whole block away!"
Sandblasting, or rustication have their "raison d'être" for a reason.
 

Sasquatch

Wizzard
Staff member
#26
Nice irony, or perhaps sarcasm is a more fitting term - but:
It is totally legit expecting a smooth pipe to be fill-free, at least in my opinion.
I do not think that somebody here is as arrogant as to say: "Throw the whole block away!"
Sandblasting, or rustication have their "raison d'être" for a reason.
On the surface (haha) I'd agree with this, but the truth is, unless every smooth pipe is going to be 400 bucks, it can't happen. There are many really good blocks that with just one fill make an absolutely beautiful pipe, and it would be a shame to throw out a bunch of babies with the bathwater, as it were. So it allows manufacturers to make smooths at reasonable price points, and hopefully they don't get carried away (I saw Peterson Sherlock Holmes where the shank was more putty than briar).

There's levels for all this stuff - my Christmas pipes this year were a good example - I got lots of smooths out of the briar (12 bought: 1 wormy, 3 thrown away while working, total of 8 pipes I think - and got like, 7 smooths and 1 rustic, very strange). But the smooths were very very plain, no grain really, just a brown block of wood. I'd much prefer to make smooths with all kinds of stripes and birdeye and stuff, and so pretty often I will rusticate or blast a pipe even if it's a technically good enough to be a smooth, just to keep my smooth grade as my best pieces.
 

Bernie Rain

Well-known member
#27
...pretty often I will rusticate or blast a pipe even if it's a technically good enough to be a smooth, just to keep my smooth grade as my best pieces.
This is called "building a reputation".
I have 2 "Modica" (Ser Jacopo) pipes (smooth), did cost me as much as a "medium" Savinelli.
The Ser Jacopo "Seconds" (if you want to call the modicas so) are free of fills.
They don't have beautiful grain, but aren't speckled with fills like my Savinelli.

.. unless every smooth pipe is going to be 400 bucks, it can't happen...
I don't expect a 65,- EUR "Vauen" pipe (smooth) to be free of fills.
But I have one (it was my first pipe) and it is free of fills.

I expect a smooth Savinelli to have fills, unless I buy a "Linea Artisan".