Dry tobacco - how do you revive it?

ClintonvilleLeather

Well-known member
Sales
#41
I don't rehydrate. In my experience, rehydration never fully restores the taste of the blend. And most of what i smoke improves with moisture loss. Consequently, it becomes a matter of smoking a blend that tastes less good or simply tossing it. I would rather not smoke a blend unless it is at its best...just no point.

But if i felt i couldnt just throw it away, i would use slow tri's method.
I havent had luck either. Always seems like something is missing.
 

Tianlin

Well-known member
#42
Crispy you say, I always worry i'll dry it out too much. Do you fold and stuff or rub it out when it's crispy? I always imagine it crumbling to dust. I still think im not crispifying it enough.
If you'd prefer to completely dry your tobacco but want to fold and stuff, just load the tobacco before drying and then leave the pipe alone for at least a day or two, let it dry in the pipe.

Maybe I'm being overly negative, but if you're asking for our personal experience....rehydrating isn't really worthwhile in most cases for the reasons already mentioned, and most aromatics lose flavor anyway over time. Aromatics - at least, the vast majority of them - are best fresh. A tin of aromatic pipe tobacco that's been open five years and become bone dry? Likely a lost cause. Even if you get it back to its old springy self, it just won't taste like it's supposed to. If you want to revisit the blend, you're better off with a fresh tin imo.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
#43
If you'd prefer to completely dry your tobacco but want to fold and stuff, just load the tobacco before drying and then leave the pipe alone for at least a day or two, let it dry in the pipe.

Maybe I'm being overly negative, but if you're asking for our personal experience....rehydrating isn't really worthwhile in most cases for the reasons already mentioned, and most aromatics lose flavor anyway over time. Aromatics - at least, the vast majority of them - are best fresh. A tin of aromatic pipe tobacco that's been open five years and become bone dry? Likely a lost cause. Even if you get it back to its old springy self, it just won't taste like it's supposed to. If you want to revisit the blend, you're better off with a fresh tin imo.
I agree.

I must say there are exceptions to that. I traded a tin of cao black that was 5 years old with former forum member kraken.
That was the best aro I ever had and I crave it to this day.
 

RedScot

Well-known member
#44
I have some super crispy 5105 that I refuse to rehydrate. I have to be on top of my game formwise - too fast and it loses flavor. But when I have my cadence right it's a superb treat.
I don't want to have to be so mindful of every bowl. PS LNF works wonderfully as a "stay in the background" bowl, but if I get the urge, or when circumstances require, that little bit of 5105 is beautiful.
It's a leftover from a batch that I jarred up, a gift from a good friend, that's been in a bag since last Christmas. I suppose the jar could've held that last little bowl or two, but...
 

Jerry Ford

Well-known member
#45
Several years ago my elderly mother bought out her local tobacco shop of its Early Morning Pipe stock as a present to me. It was an absurd amount of tobacco. As much as I smoke that blend and love it, there was no way I'd finish it before it got dry.

Indeed, it got dry.

My lovely (non-elderly) wife bought me some good aftershave--Royall Bay Rum. It's cool and traditional, but it came with this really stupid mist sprayer on the side. Just a sprayer, packaged with the bottle. And it has a hose thing attached to it.

Two wonderful women unwittingly bought me a pipe education. By supplying my own distilled water, I used the stupid mist sprayer to spray about an ounce at a time of the dry EMP and jarred it. The results are absolutely magnificent.

TRY IT!
 

Sparks

Well-known member
#47
I usually:
  1. Put the tobacco in a bowl
  2. Soak a towel or washcloth with Distilled Water
  3. Lay the towel over the bowl and let it re-hydrate for a minimum of 8 hours
This seems to let the tobacco reabsorb the moisture at its own pace.

I would strongly advise putting any kind of food stuffs in with pipe tobacco.
I just brought a plastic baggie of rimboche S.J. back to life using this method, though it took almost 2 days under the towel.

It was bone dry, turning to snuff in the bottom of the bag so I’m sure that had something to do with it. Thanks for the awesome suggestion!
 

Slow Tri

Is it Friday yet?
Sales
#48
I just brought a plastic baggie of rimboche S.J. back to life using this method, though it took almost 2 days under the towel.

It was bone dry, turning to snuff in the bottom of the bag so I’m sure that had something to do with it. Thanks for the awesome suggestion!
You’re certainly welcome. I’m glad that my ramblings help out sometimes.
 

derangedhermit

Well-known member
Patron
#49
One reason I may add a little moisture to a tobacco is to slow the burn rate. Kendal Kentucky burns faster than I like, for example. Many shag blends do.

My current method is to spread a small amount, a thin layer, of tobacco in the bottom of a colander, cover it with a paper towel, and set it on top of a room humidifier for a few minutes. It's very quick and easy. I only do this for things I'll smoke within a week.
 

RedScot

Well-known member
#50
I just brought a plastic baggie of rimboche S.J. back to life using this method, though it took almost 2 days under the towel.

It was bone dry, turning to snuff in the bottom of the bag so I’m sure that had something to do with it. Thanks for the awesome suggestion!
I'd've been hard pressed not to throw it in the mortar and grind it the rest of the way to snuff.
I dried out a bit of Black Irish Twist last year for just such an experiment and it was yowzers. Now I'm eyeing the Sweet Whisky Twist and that little bit of crumb that's accumulating in the bottom of the jar.
There's no good reason not to. It doesn't have the same "hit" of nicotine that store-bought snuff has - it isn't as alkaline so your schnozz doesn't absorb the nicotine as quickly - but it's still potent.
 

mongo

Well-known member
#52
I'd've been hard pressed not to throw it in the mortar and grind it the rest of the way to snuff.
I dried out a bit of Black Irish Twist last year for just such an experiment and it was yowzers. Now I'm eyeing the Sweet Whisky Twist and that little bit of crumb that's accumulating in the bottom of the jar.
There's no good reason not to. It doesn't have the same "hit" of nicotine that store-bought snuff has - it isn't as alkaline so your schnozz doesn't absorb the nicotine as quickly - but it's still potent.
Talk to @Darin … he makes his own snuff, and may have some recommendations to help alkalinize so you get better results.
 

RedScot

Well-known member
#53
Talk to @Darin … he makes his own snuff, and may have some recommendations to help alkalinize so you get better results.
I have a basic recipe that uses baking soda that's been heated to drive off water, leaving sodium carbonate. That, a drop or two of water, and a dab of coconut oil.
I just didn't add any to the ground twist - it was an experiment done solely out of curiosity.
Even without the pH boost it's strong. The bang that alkalinized snuff isn't there, but you can feel the nicotine build. Quite the interesting feeling.
 

RedScot

Well-known member
#54
I have a basic recipe that uses baking soda that's been heated to drive off water, leaving sodium carbonate. That, a drop or two of water, and a dab of coconut oil.
I just didn't add any to the ground twist - it was an experiment done solely out of curiosity.
Even without the pH boost it's strong. The bang that alkalinized snuff isn't there, but you can feel the nicotine build. Quite the interesting feeling.
Actually that can't be right. There's no way to get Na2CO3 from NaHCO3. You can dry it off, but not change ratios.
The reaction is

2NaHCO3 --> Na2CO3 + H2O + CO2