Famous Smokers and their tobaccos of choice

MLC

Foggy Fogey.
#41


Arthur Miller seemed to favor Dunhill My Mixture blends, but was known to smoke other stuff as well, like Walnut.

As to which specific My Mixture I don't know and he may have even had his own personal numbered blend in the books,
you can tell by the 'paint can' style of tin that it was blended at American Dunhill stores:


...although the tin he's using as a catch-all for his pipes appears to be an English-made cutter-top:


"This is a subject as dear to pipemen as their bowls. No one knows how many blends of tobacco there are—Dunhill alone has a list of 50,000, plus its branded blends. Pipemen spend months and even years concocting a blend that suits them, and virtually every pipeshop of any pretensions caters to these amateurs. So the smoking of a pipe, a capital‐intensive avocation, tends to be a vocation for those who take it seriously."

Above quote from an Oct. 6th 1975 NYT article which mentioned Miller, and it's a rather in-depth piece that even mentions estate pipes:

"Pipes of good briar, which are made from the root of the bush, seem to last, if not forever, at least a long time, for there is a brisk business in used ones.
And passing along one such is rated as an act of special friendship."


And Tom Dunn from TPSE even makes an appearance!
I enjoyed reading it:
https://www.nytimes.com/1975/10/06/...-pipes-varied-but-with-some-similarities.html

:puffy:
 

Waino

Lord´s humble cuckoo
Patron
#44
Georgian psycho Josif Vissarionovitš Džugašvili, better known in Soviet Union as Josef Stalin, smoked Royal Yacht. He got it in a diplomatic mail.

Albert Einstein smoked House of Windsor - Revelation.

Verified:

revelation.jpg

But who knows what other blends they liked. Probably Stalin smoked malodorous makhorka before he got into the in-groups.
 
Last edited:

joeahearn

Well-known member
#45
Groucho smoked Dunhill blends... dunno which ones. He did appear in an ad for Edgeworth Ready Rubbed.

Gerald Ford was reported to have smoked Field & Stream, and Walnut, but in a recent book about him, the writer said Ford's tobacco of choice was Edgeworth Ready Rubbed.

William Conrad smoked Amphora Full and Dunhill blends.

Charles Nelson Reilly smoked Mick McQuaid Ready Rubbed and Three Star Blue.

Shelby Foote smoked Edward G. Robinson's Pipe Bend for a while, until he decided to cut it by adding a third of various OTCs to it. However, the last blend he was known to smoke was two parts EGR and one part Barking Dog.

Bing Crosby smoked various blends, but we know he smoked Hayward Mixture, as seen in a photo on a book about him. I've seen a note to Strauss Tobacconists where he said "Send me my usual...", though we don't know what blend he was referring to. I'm very dubious about the Crooner blend story. If Bing smoked it at all, it was later in life.

Edward G. Robinson smoked a variety of blends, including the one named after him and Dunhill blends.

Alfred Hitchcock smoked Dunhill blends.

I wish I knew what Bernard Lee smoked when he played "M" in the Bond movies.
@JimInks, have you smoked the Shelby Foote blend of 2/3 EGR and 1/3 Barking Dog? As an admirer of Foote, I'd like to make up a batch of his blend. But only if it's at least passing decent. Smoking Bertrand Russell's favorite, F & T Golden Mixture, has taught me that sometimes one's heroes smoke rotten tobacco.
 

JimInks

Well-known member
Old Ted Award Winner
#46
@JimInks, have you smoked the Shelby Foote blend of 2/3 EGR and 1/3 Barking Dog? As an admirer of Foote, I'd like to make up a batch of his blend. But only if it's at least passing decent. Smoking Bertrand Russell's favorite, F & T Golden Mixture, has taught me that sometimes one's heroes smoke rotten tobacco.
I certainly have tried it. A friend who knew Shelby Foote sent me a batch of it, and I enjoyed it. I still prefer EGR on its own, but I think you'd find this mix a little fullsome and deep in flavor. Btw, the Barking Dog Match is very close to the original, so you'll be able to replicate what Foote was smoking.

Now smoking MacBaren HH Burley Flake in a 2002 medium bend smooth Rinaldo EGEA 03 Silver line spigot 10 with a black acrylic stem. Simply Lemonade is my drink. Suzy was on my lap until I got up to get a new smoke and drink, and she wasn't happy about it. But, now she's laying on my feet, so all is well in her world. She is the ultimate lap cat.
 

joeahearn

Well-known member
#47
I certainly have tried it. A friend who knew Shelby Foote sent me a batch of it, and I enjoyed it. I still prefer EGR on its own, but I think you'd find this mix a little fullsome and deep in flavor. Btw, the Barking Dog Match is very close to the original, so you'll be able to replicate what Foote was smoking.

Now smoking MacBaren HH Burley Flake in a 2002 medium bend smooth Rinaldo EGEA 03 Silver line spigot 10 with a black acrylic stem. Simply Lemonade is my drink. Suzy was on my lap until I got up to get a new smoke and drink, and she wasn't happy about it. But, now she's laying on my feet, so all is well in her world. She is the ultimate lap cat.
Thanks for the good counsel, @JimInks. I have a half dozen cans of EGR on hand and I also just happen to have some Match Barking Dog. So I'll mix some up and think about Mr. Foote, who was certainly a writer's writer.
 

MLC

Foggy Fogey.
#48


Howlin' Wolf apparently liked Edgeworth Aromatic...




...but that just could have been a sample pouch of the 'red' which came out in the late 60's, it may explain why he's holding it up for the camera?
I think when Rothmans took over Larus they perhaps tried to stimulate market growth by introducing new blends, maybe at that time Edgeworth was seen as a stodgy ol' codger smoke by the hip youngsters of the time and Rothmans wanted to 'update' it?

In the pic, the pouch looks exactly like this,
to my eyes:
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1960s-unopened-factory-sealed-414137889

Larus & Brother Co. was sold to Rothmans of Canada Ltd. in late 1968 and the name was changed to House of Edgeworth which operated until 1974 when it was closed down.

And,:headbang:
I can't resist to post up one of my fave trax by the Wolf...


The yeah! at 1:26 is extra awesome, as is the entire song imo
 

Coda

Well-known member
#49


Howlin' Wolf apparently liked Edgeworth Aromatic...




...but that just could have been a sample pouch of the 'red' which came out in the late 60's, it may explain why he's holding it up for the camera?
I think when Rothmans took over Larus they perhaps tried to stimulate market growth by introducing new blends, maybe at that time Edgeworth was seen as a stodgy ol' codger smoke by the hip youngsters of the time and Rothmans wanted to 'update' it?

In the pic, the pouch looks exactly like this,
to my eyes:
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1960s-unopened-factory-sealed-414137889

Larus & Brother Co. was sold to Rothmans of Canada Ltd. in late 1968 and the name was changed to House of Edgeworth which operated until 1974 when it was closed down.

And,:headbang:
I can't resist to post up one of my fave trax by the Wolf...


The yeah! at 1:26 is extra awesome, as is the entire song imo
There’s an ad for Edgeworth Executive Mixture featuring Norman Rockwell that I believe dates from the late 50’s. I think it mentions the House of Edgeworth brand. I’d post it but I’m not on my laptop...
 

Coda

Well-known member
#52
Thanks for the good counsel, @JimInks. I have a half dozen cans of EGR on hand and I also just happen to have some Match Barking Dog. So I'll mix some up and think about Mr. Foote, who was certainly a writer's writer.
...and a pipe smoker’s pipe smoker. He was smoking pipes and 2 packs of Chersterfields most of his adult life...until he had a bypass surgery. The doctor told him to quit smoking, and he did...he quit the Chesterfields. He ended is smoking his pipe twice as much as before...

There is also an interview with him where the interviewer cringes when Foote knocks his vintage Dunhill against the metal trash can to empty the ashes...and then proceeds to load up again from a tub of PA...
 

MLC

Foggy Fogey.
#53


It is well known that Georges Simenon favored Dunhill's Royal Yacht,
but he also smoked other stuff.

In this desk photo you can see 2 tins of Dobies's along with the tin of RY:

https://www.trussel.com/maig/image/librematch07.jpg

A neat Dunhill Wangee in that pic too.

When he was living in the USA (1945–1955) he favored Granger!

So noted in a 1951 letter and pub'd in The Pipe Smokers Ephemeris winter/spring 1993...



As for pipes, he's known as a Dunhill man, but as this excerpt indicates,
even back in '51 there were plaints against the company from stalwart pipemen for going the 'luxury goods' route...

 

joeahearn

Well-known member
#54


It is well known that Georges Simenon favored Dunhill's Royal Yacht,
but he also smoked other stuff.

In this desk photo you can see 2 tins of Dobies's along with the tin of RY:

https://www.trussel.com/maig/image/librematch07.jpg

A neat Dunhill Wangee in that pic too.

When he was living in the USA (1945–1955) he favored Granger!

So noted in a 1951 letter and pub'd in The Pipe Smokers Ephemeris winter/spring 1993...



As for pipes, he's known as a Dunhill man, but as this excerpt indicates,
even back in '51 there were plaints against the company from stalwart pipemen for going the 'luxury goods' route...

Fascinating. Thanks for posting this. I need to get back to reading Simenon.
 

Pipepunk

Well-known member
#55
Georgian psycho Josif Vissarionovitš Džugašvili, better known in Soviet Union as Josef Stalin, smoked Royal Yacht. He got it in a diplomatic mail.

Albert Einstein smoked House of Windsor - Revelation.

Verified:

View attachment 5015

But who knows what other blends they liked. Probably Stalin smoked malodorous makhorka before he got into the in-groups.
Exact source escapes me but I vaguely recall in an article somewhere that Stalin liked edgeworth ready rubbed and had it brought to him in diplomatic pouches
 

Waino

Lord´s humble cuckoo
Patron
#57
Exact source escapes me but I vaguely recall in an article somewhere that Stalin liked edgeworth ready rubbed and had it brought to him in diplomatic pouches
I am sure he used several blends. Royal Yacht is mostly mentioned, I do not know why. It is true that George Kennan at least once supplied Stalin with plain, old ready-rubbed American Edgeworth tobacco.

In 1920´s Stalin smoked "Herzegovina Flor" which became known as "Stalin's Choice." Since it only appeared in cigarettes, Stalin would take two cigarettes out of a box and shred them into his pipe.

George F. Kennan was known best as an advocate of a policy of containment of Soviet expansion during the Cold War on which he later reversed himself. His writings inspired Truman Doctrine. I like him.
 

MLC

Foggy Fogey.
#59



C.S. Lewis is often cited as being a Three Nuns man, but he also smoked Gold Block:
"According to a letter from Douglas Gresham, the Lewis brothers both preferred Three Nuns and Gold Block brands of pipe tobacco, and they usually smoked Gold Flake and Senior Service cigarettes with Players Navy Cut as a second choice."

He also smoked Player's pipe tobacco, in this desk photo the blend appears to be Tawny,
but I can't tell for certain?



Suppposedly, he liked to have nice, smoky coal fire going, then eithier puff away at a pipe or chain smoke cigarettes until the atmosphere in the room was transformed to,
in his words, "a proper fug".

A couple of quotes:

"...CSL was ever anxious to warn against looking for a complicated explanation when none was required. He was especially impatient with those who discarded the plain common-sense for the complex. Amusingly on one occasion he took to task those who read deep meaning into his smoking habits and his attachment to a collection of favorite pipes: "They wonder why I like to smoke a pipe and think it has something to do with getting me into a contemplative frame of mind. Do they ever consider that I might just like the taste and smell of tobacco?"
from:
C. S. Lewis Remembered: Collected Reflections of Students, Friends and Colleagues

:puffy:
...and apparently he also had the Sherlockian habit of re-smoking old dottles!

"The bitterest, and also funniest, things came out when he had risen abruptly from table (always before the rest of us) and stood ferreting in a villainous old tobacco jar on the mantlepiece for the dottles of former pipes which it was his frugal habit to use again."
from:
Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life

And,
I dunno if this report regarding the clench positions of CSL is accurate or fictional fantasy,
but it is quite interesting nonetheless:
http://crudefutures.typepad.com/crude_futures/2004/09/cs_lewis_overdr.html

 

Pipepunk

Well-known member
#60


Arthur Miller seemed to favor Dunhill My Mixture blends, but was known to smoke other stuff as well, like Walnut.

As to which specific My Mixture I don't know and he may have even had his own personal numbered blend in the books,
you can tell by the 'paint can' style of tin that it was blended at American Dunhill stores:


...although the tin he's using as a catch-all for his pipes appears to be an English-made cutter-top:


"This is a subject as dear to pipemen as their bowls. No one knows how many blends of tobacco there are—Dunhill alone has a list of 50,000, plus its branded blends. Pipemen spend months and even years concocting a blend that suits them, and virtually every pipeshop of any pretensions caters to these amateurs. So the smoking of a pipe, a capital‐intensive avocation, tends to be a vocation for those who take it seriously."

Above quote from an Oct. 6th 1975 NYT article which mentioned Miller, and it's a rather in-depth piece that even mentions estate pipes:

"Pipes of good briar, which are made from the root of the bush, seem to last, if not forever, at least a long time, for there is a brisk business in used ones.
And passing along one such is rated as an act of special friendship."


And Tom Dunn from TPSE even makes an appearance!
I enjoyed reading it:
https://www.nytimes.com/1975/10/06/...-pipes-varied-but-with-some-similarities.html

:puffy:
As an aside the res an Ohio based alt rock band called 22 pilots an oblique reference to a line from the play and movie all my sons by Arthur miller