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He's doing what with his tins?

millarddj

Perpetual whippersnapper
Patron
#1
Some have probably seen this: A SmokingPipes "Tasting Notes" video from last year. I gave it a quick view when doing some tobacco research, but something caught my ear: at about 20 seconds in, Shane says he "periodically checks on" his tins to see "how they're coming along". Later, at about 5:15, he gets more explicit, saying "I'm doing my best not to crack them prematurely but, you know, you gotta check on that every once in a while and see how it's coming along".

Am I interpreting this correctly by understanding that he's breaking the seals on all his tins while they're in storage? Because the implication is that he just "checks" them - doesn't just open them to smoke them. How do you break a seal "every once in a while?"

My understanding has been that conventional wisdom is generally not cracking tins until you're ready to smoke them. Or, if you've bought a batch, opening a single tin earlier to jar and compare smoking characteristics to the others when they age.

Is his practice irregular, or do some pipers make a practice of say, storing a batch of tins in a sealed tote or something and opening all tins to inspect them on occasion?

Maybe I should go crack the seal on my '04 Bayou Morning to see "how it's coming along?"

Reference:

 

blackmouth210

Well-known member
#2
I don't interpret his comments to mean he opens a tin, checks how it's aging, then puts it back in the cellar. But I could see where someone would.

Each time he references that he "cracks a tin" to check how the blend is "coming along" he also mentions that he's got quite a few tins of the blend in his cellar.

So I understand that what he's saying is that he opens a tin to smoke it.
Thereby checking how the tins (the collection) are coming along.
He's using the tin he opens/smokes as a gauge to read how well the rest of the cellared tins of this blend are aging.

But that's just how I take his comments.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
#5
Or.... He uses a walk in humidor for his storage of open tins? Just guessing.
I suggest reading what GL Pease writes on his homepage about the chemistry and/ or biology that we know as aging.

While regular opening of tins will still result in an aging of the tobacco, the aerobic processes will be much more pronounced then in unopened tins. Therefore the results will be quite different when aging long enough.

So: Common aging is unopened tins. According to glp there is no reason not to try alternative methods.
 

leacha

░░░░░
Sales
#6
I suggest reading what GL Pease writes on his homepage about the chemistry and/ or biology that we know as aging.

While regular opening of tins will still result in an aging of the tobacco, the aerobic processes will be much more pronounced then in unopened tins. Therefore the results will be quite different when aging long enough.

So: Common aging is unopened tins. According to glp there is no reason not to try alternative methods.
No disagreement here. I just proposed a situation that I would use if made available to me. I use a "degassing" method for a number of blends and if I had a humidor that would accommodate a number of open tins, I would be employing multiple methods to aging of my tins.
 

Tobias Tobit

Well-known member
#7
No disagreement here. I just proposed a situation that I would use if made available to me. I use a "degassing" method for a number of blends and if I had a humidor that would accommodate a number of open tins, I would be employing multiple methods to aging of my tins.
Where can I find more information about " degassing"? Never heard of it.
 

leacha

░░░░░
Sales
#8
Where can I find more information about " degassing"? Never heard of it.
Some of the McClelland blends were heavy on the "ketchup" taste and aroma and a few smokers noticed it would dissipate after sitting in the open tin for awhile. You just crack open a tin, stir the contents and close. Repeat every few days or so for a week or two. This process helps dissipate blends that are heavily cased or top dressed like a few McClelland blends and currently (at least to my taste) Escudo and Sutliff 1849.
 

Slow Tri

Is it Friday yet?
Sales
#9
No disagreement here. I just proposed a situation that I would use if made available to me. I use a "degassing" method for a number of blends and if I had a humidor that would accommodate a number of open tins, I would be employing multiple methods to aging of my tins.
I agree with Andy here. I have several tins of certain blends and I may just "burp" them and see what happens to them in the future. This may not be exactly relevant here but I have been doing a lot of sourdough baking and the one thing that I have figured out is that there are many different pathways to success when it comes to this. Plus I have brewed my own beer, vodka and made my own pickled items over the years.

I think that with pipe tobacco it may be the same thing. We treat it like a fragile beast that should not be tampered with until we are actually going to pack it into a pipe. I have had several bulging tins that were going crazy with fermentation that I opened and smoked and then put them in a mason jar and let them age for a bit longer. Some were better with age.....some weren't. Not every blend gets better with age.

We shouldn't discourage experimentation. It only helps all of us in the long run.
 

Adam Bybee

Well-known member
Sales
#11
I don't interpret his comments to mean he opens a tin, checks how it's aging, then puts it back in the cellar. But I could see where someone would.

Each time he references that he "cracks a tin" to check how the blend is "coming along" he also mentions that he's got quite a few tins of the blend in his cellar.

So I understand that what he's saying is that he opens a tin to smoke it.
Thereby checking how the tins (the collection) are coming along.
He's using the tin he opens/smokes as a gauge to read how well the rest of the cellared tins of this blend are aging.

But that's just how I take his comments.
This is the correct answer, I think. Having listened to podcasts where Shane discusses his cellaring habits, he usually has many tins of a particular blend with the same age and, if he hasn't aged a blend before, will open and smoke tins to "check on" the stock as a whole to determine the optimum timeframe. He isn't talking about opening a tin and then resealing it or anything.