Home tobacco press

tfdickson

Well-known member
Sales
Patron
Heating up the entire press in an 18 year old wedding present that has been sitting in a box unopened until today.....:)

I have it dialed in at about 130° thanks to my trusty thermoworks probe. I opened up the toaster oven and am cranking down on the press every 30 minutes or so. Can’t smoke in the house, so is a good excuse to bang around in the garage with a pipe in my mouth and oversee this little experiment.

Hopefully these heated pucks will stay compressed longer once out of the press.
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Very cool!
 

Logs

Well-known member
Heating up the entire press in an 18 year old wedding present that has been sitting in a box unopened until today.....:)

I have it dialed in at about 130° thanks to my trusty thermoworks probe. I opened up the toaster oven and am cranking down on the press every 30 minutes or so. Can’t smoke in the house, so is a good excuse to bang around in the garage with a pipe in my mouth and oversee this little experiment.

Hopefully these heated pucks will stay compressed longer once out of the press.
Kinda surprised anyone's having difficulty keeping their pucks compressed. I have the opposite problem. The pucks come out like solid rocks and stay that way, rather than like crumble cakes or normal plugs. They're a real pain to slice. Plus when you rub it out the ribbon structure is pretty much destroyed and you end up with a pile of crumbs. And is there such a thing as too much flavor melding? My pressings seem to lose any complexity whatsoever and become one big mono-flavor. I've come to think too much pressure is maybe a bigger problem than too little.
 

BlueMaxx

"Foo Was Here"
Patron
Kinda surprised anyone's having difficulty keeping their pucks compressed. I have the opposite problem. The pucks come out like solid rocks and stay that way, rather than like crumble cakes or normal plugs. They're a real pain to slice. Plus when you rub it out the ribbon structure is pretty much destroyed and you end up with a pile of crumbs. And is there such a thing as too much flavor melding? My pressings seem to lose any complexity whatsoever and become one big mono-flavor. I've come to think too much pressure is maybe a bigger problem than too little.
As a beginner, I am very interested in these answers...
 

FrankHall

Well-known member
Sales
As a beginner, I am very interested in these answers...
I wouldn't worry too much about failure - just read through the posts and you'll be fine. If you read my summary in a recent post, it basically agrees with what Ted has posted (and most everyone else). Worst case is your first plug isn't 'perfect' and you adjust how weak/strong you tighten and for how long.

I've done around 30 and they were all perfect - just like a nice solid store-bought plug, with loads of flavor. You can email me if you have any questions or want to discuss further.
 

McWiggins

Well-known member
Kinda surprised anyone's having difficulty keeping their pucks compressed. I have the opposite problem. The pucks come out like solid rocks and stay that way, rather than like crumble cakes or normal plugs. They're a real pain to slice. Plus when you rub it out the ribbon structure is pretty much destroyed and you end up with a pile of crumbs. And is there such a thing as too much flavor melding? My pressings seem to lose any complexity whatsoever and become one big mono-flavor. I've come to think too much pressure is maybe a bigger problem than too little.
How much pressure are you putting it under? I've read where Mac Baren will press using 55 tons.
 

tfdickson

Well-known member
Sales
Patron
How much pressure are you putting it under? I've read where Mac Baren will press using 55 tons.
This is a rough estimate, but using basic mechanical leverage formulas I figured that with an estimated 50lb of force applied the noodle press comes in at 3 tons. The trick was coming up with the number of revolutions required for an inch of vertical travel.
 

BlueMaxx

"Foo Was Here"
Patron
I wouldn't worry too much about failure - just read through the posts and you'll be fine. If you read my summary in a recent post, it basically agrees with what Ted has posted (and most everyone else). Worst case is your first plug isn't 'perfect' and you adjust how weak/strong you tighten and for how long.

I've done around 30 and they were all perfect - just like a nice solid store-bought plug, with loads of flavor. You can email me if you have any questions or want to discuss further.

Will do...
 

McWiggins

Well-known member
This is a rough estimate, but using basic mechanical leverage formulas I figured that with an estimated 50lb of force applied the noodle press comes in at 3 tons. The trick was coming up with the number of revolutions required for an inch of vertical travel.
I struggled, worked hard to pass in school but still struggled hard at this sort of stuff. To me, this is you right now.

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FrankHall

Well-known member
Sales
Pressing a blend an already perfectly good blend hard as a rock doesn't make it better. (It does save a lot of space though).
If you can't hold back your massive strength, then let your girlfriend or wife to the turning for you. I'm lucky enough to have perfect wrist/arm strength for pressing plugs. I can barely open jars anymore, but they get opened in the end.

Good luck.