Home tobacco press

Jomil

Member
Greetings.
I must try 3 Friars pressed. Just a passing newby here.... having finished absorbing all 77 pages of this super informative tobacco preparation encyclopedia.... I have successfully noobacco pressed some of my air and kiln-cured, home grown, 25 plant, 9 variety, year 2020 tobacco crop. I use a similar method to that generally described previously here. But the main difference is that I don't preheat the tobacco because it is whole leaf. Instead of adding moisture, I make sure it is infused to a pliable, smoking ready state using distilled water. I add a small amount of my favorite commercial blend sprinkled among the leaves as they are loaded into tube. Crank it down snug and... Here's the big deal.... Put the press in my dorm refrigerator that has been converted to a fermenting chamber with a 15 watt lightbulb....It keeps a constant 120 degreeF ...for 7 days. Plug came out with out any drama. Test sliced the very firm plug with my leather cutter guillotine knife... Superior to conventional knives. Jarred the plug and washed the noobacy press, then reloaded with 515, 507s, and C and D Izmir. No microwave. Back in the fermentation chamber. And again.

Ordered another press! You guys rock!! Can provide many pics if any questions.
 

snake

permanent ankle biter
Sales
Patron
Whew! Made it through all 78 pages!

I sampled Plug #5 - 35g Coniston/25g Cherry Cream Flake, and it's actually sweeter than the un-pressed 50/50 blend.

Plug #7: Yesterday started a press replacing some of the Cherry Cream with the last of the Bob's Chocolate and something unflavored. I think it's going to be great, and if not, I'll tweak it one more time. I'm surprised no one's asked about how I got the designs in the plugs. Tip: if the bottom cap is too tight, wear one of those disposable glove on the hand you'll be twisting with. Better still - clean the cap and threads before pressing.

Here's Plug #6 (30g/30g Coniston/Cherry Cream) - the light stuff is the Cherry Cream. Also, that's Santa on one side and a rose on the other. I think I'll go with nothing but the spider/web combination on future plugs.

View attachment 70453
Frank,
you got pics of these "impression plates"?

I think I'm going to manufacture something
of a homemade press as I don't see myself
pressing a lot of blends, and can easily make
something with my wood & metal lathes.
 

Jomil

Member
That is a big deal, awesome idea!
I also put the jarred puck in the chamber along with my homegrown whole leaf/ shredded that there terbaccy. I will allow it to remain there a few weeks to further meld and cure before slicing any more. I will check for expansion occasionally. Open for noticable aroma changes. All at a constant 120 deg. The chamber humidity is currently at a steady 20 percent.... which is the humidity of my basement 😁. I live down there.
 

Jomil

Member
Thanks to the 1500+ posts here, I have a way to reduce the space my tobacco reserves require for aging. This is very impressive. Here's my first noobacco puck results (using whole leaf tobaccos), and my heat chamber method of turning my garden fresh tobacco or commercial bulk tobaccos into cured and fermented pressed pucks.IMG_20210118_040134963.jpgIMG_20210120_132246238_HDR.jpg
 

Jomil

Member
I like your light bulb method. I've been using a heating pad to keep my press warm. (The vent under my computer works pretty well too)
Great! Did you pre nuke the tobacco before closing the press? How long did you keep whole shebang warm? I like the recovery of wasted computer energy if it gets warm enough. I was using a box made of Styrofoam packing sheets 11/2 inches thick. Only needed 7.5 watt bulb, but was outgrowing that. l took the beer out of the dorm fridge, but a bulb in a can, and presto ....a sealed, insulated, 120 deg fermenting chamber for the noobacco project!
 

Logs

Well-known member
Great! Did you pre nuke the tobacco before closing the press? How long did you keep whole shebang warm? I like the recovery of wasted computer energy if it gets warm enough. I was using a box made of Styrofoam packing sheets 11/2 inches thick. Only needed 7.5 watt bulb, but was outgrowing that. l took the beer out of the dorm fridge, but a bulb in a can, and presto ....a sealed, insulated, 120 deg fermenting chamber for the noobacco project!

Yes I preheat both the tobacco and the press prior to pressing. I'll press for about a week and then move the plug to a jar (which I also preheat to create a bit of a vacuum). I'm trying to age in jars for a few months before doing a trial smoke. Unfortunately it makes testing and tweaking my blending experiments a very slow process. I'm working with raw leaf and haven't really found any shortcuts.
 

Logs

Well-known member
Great! Did you pre nuke the tobacco before closing the press? How long did you keep whole shebang warm? I like the recovery of wasted computer energy if it gets warm enough. I was using a box made of Styrofoam packing sheets 11/2 inches thick. Only needed 7.5 watt bulb, but was outgrowing that. l took the beer out of the dorm fridge, but a bulb in a can, and presto ....a sealed, insulated, 120 deg fermenting chamber for the noobacco project!

Probably not a major concern but dry tobacco is supposed to degrade under light (or so they say). You might want to cover the jars or find some other method of keeping the heat but blocking the light.
 

Frotz

cause something to give off light
Patron
Probably not a major concern but dry tobacco is supposed to degrade under light (or so they say). You might want to cover the jars or find some other method of keeping the heat but blocking the light.
One could borrow an idea from the alchemists of old. When they wanted to keep something gently warm over a long period of time, they'd use the heat given off by some sort of decay process, like a compost pile.
 

Jomil

Member
Yes I preheat both the tobacco and the press prior to pressing. I'll press for about a week and then move the plug to a jar (which I also preheat to create a bit of a vacuum). I'm trying to age in jars for a few months before doing a trial smoke. Unfortunately it makes testing and tweaking my blending experiments a very slow process. I'm working with raw leaf and haven't really found any shortcuts.
I tried the pressure cooking method on some of my raw leaf. Was pleased at how quickly that changed the ribbon cut. In three hours it totally cured it black. Aroma fantastic. Led me to the 120 deg longer term kiln-cure. Allows fermentation to occur. Have a few days left in the press. Then six weeks of jarred fermentation in the kiln before airing and testing.

Probably not a major concern but dry tobacco is supposed to degrade under light (or so they say). You might want to cover the jars or find some other method of keeping the heat but blocking the light.
I can do that. Thanks.
 

Lee D

^ not me
Patron
I tried the pressure cooking method on some of my raw leaf. Was pleased at how quickly that changed the ribbon cut. In three hours it totally cured it black. Aroma fantastic. Led me to the 120 deg longer term kiln-cure. Allows fermentation to occur. Have a few days left in the press. Then six weeks of jarred fermentation in the kiln before airing and testing.
Three hours in a pressure cooker is a loooong time. My Grandmother could turn anything PawPaw brought in from his vegetable garden into gray mush in 2.
 

Jomil

Member
Three hours in a pressure cooker is a loooong time. My Grandmother could turn anything PawPaw brought in from his vegetable garden into gray mush in 2.
I ribbon cut the air cured leaf put in the cooker in canning jars on a separation tray. Added alot of water to the cooker which made it to the 3 hour mark. The moisture in the jars must have been just right because it didn't clump or any thing weird. Just beautiful dark cavendish. One was cased, the other uncased. The cased turned super black... It was honey, water, vanilla, Everclear misted on ... somewhat dried to just pliable. Been aging it for a few months now in kiln. Open occasionally to let it breath.

Here's the two I pressure cookered. They have both dried out some and lightened, and need to be rehydrated a bit. I think I will add them to a blend and press them into a crumble cake puck. Left is a VaBur, right a straight Virginia. Seeds from a place in Canada. Part of this year's crop which I harvested up to hard frost.

IMG_20210122_043543032.jpg

Sorry. Last year's crop. 2020
 
Last edited by a moderator:

BlueMaxx

Well-known member
Patron
I have been eyeing something like this as it also adds heat to the machine.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KQ387F...olid=2WAC5HRQL6687&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

In the wood shape I worked at we had a device that utilized bottle jacks and a steel cage about 6-8” wide about 9 feet long and about 4’ tall.
You glue up the boards, put them in and add cribbing if there was too much travel and crank them puppies down.

This is similar but has the added advantage of heat...there are several ones out there, ones that also have a round mold.

Our perhaps use something like these..

http://jackpuckpress.com

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IO57N0...olid=2WAC5HRQL6687&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

https://www.amazon.com/Rosineer-Pre...&keywords=pollen+press&qid=1611335778&sr=8-18

And finding someone to weld up a small rig for a jack.
 

Jomil

Member
Very coo
I have been eyeing something like this as it also adds heat to the machine.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KQ387F...olid=2WAC5HRQL6687&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

In the wood shape I worked at we had a device that utilized bottle jacks and a steel cage about 6-8” wide about 9 feet long and about 4’ tall.
You glue up the boards, put them in and add cribbing if there was too much travel and crank them puppies down.

This is similar but has the added advantage of heat...there are several ones out there, ones that also have a round mold.

Our perhaps use something like these..

http://jackpuckpress.com

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IO57N0...olid=2WAC5HRQL6687&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

https://www.amazon.com/Rosineer-Pre...&keywords=pollen+press&qid=1611335778&sr=8-18

And finding someone to weld up a small rig for a jack.
Very cool.
 

Jomil

Member
The coming out of "Blind Victorian". One week in noobacco press. 2.0 oz, 1 1/8" thick puck. Blend of (4 parts) 515, (3 parts) Elizabethan match, (1 part) 3 Blind Moose. Moderate pressure.
Test drive for this crumble cake will probably be in a "Looped C" Custom-Bilt.

Have a nice week.IMG_20210124_093346409.jpg
 
Top Bottom