Jim's Pipe Collection.

JimInks

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You have really been diving into the Peterson’s lately Jim!
I do like Petersons a lot, especially those with a p-lip. So does the fella who's been giving me these pipes. He's really into early pipes now, particularly those made in the 1880's-1930s, and other companies along with Petersons. I'm getting his extras or the ones he doesn't care to smoke any more. At the same time I got these pipes, he gave another fella ten Petes, including a couple pre-republics.

I have more Petes than any other company: 60. Next is Comoy's, of which I have 58.
 
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Thepipehunter

Well-known member
I do like Petersons a lot, especially those with a p-lip. So does the fella who's been giving me these pipes. He's really into early pipes now, particularly those made in the 1880's-1930s, and other companies along with Petersons. I'm getting his extras or the ones he doesn't care to smoke any more. At the same time I got these pipes, he gave another fella ten Petes, including a couple pre-republics.

I have more Petes than any other company: 60. Next is Comoy's, of which I have 58.
Fantastic! I also love P-lip Petersons, especially system pipes. My collection is growing slowly, I’m at 5, but I am looking forward to adding more over the years.
 

JimInks

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Old Ted Award
I never posted these Dr. Grabow Omegas. They were the closest I was able to come to getting a 4AB style back then. Amazing how things change over the years.

This was the first pipe I bought back in July 1974 for $2.49. I mowed a neighbor's lawn to get the two bucks I needed for it.
Dr.Grabow_Omega_1974.jpg

I bought this one in July of that year by collecting pop bottles and mowing another yard for $2.00. Bought some tobacco, too.
Dr.Grabow_Omega_ Sandblast.jpg

Bought this one in the summer of 1978 for $2.95. It's a tad smaller than the other two, and a little more expensive.
Dr.Grabow_Omega_1978.jpg

I bought this Grand Duke in January of 1979 when I was out playing in the snow with my then-girl friend, and needed a smoke. Paid $2.00 for it at the Piggly-Wiggly. What a terrible name for a store. Anyway, it smoked hot, and I sanded off the wax to get a cooler, better smoke.
Dr.Grabow_GrandDuke_pot.jpg
 

hild

Well-known member
Sir, I recently signed on with this group of cool, inveterate pipe smokers. It is easily noted that you are a discerning, dedicated pipe collector. Your special selections are marvelously artistic, and noted you have a possible bent for "comic art". It's quite coincidental in a stange way. Since retiring in 2013, I fell, quite by accident, into an acting career. Recently, A24 shot part of a feature film at our home, called "Funny Pages". Maybe you like comic art almost as much as you do pipes. https://a24films.com/films/funny-pages Here's A24 the link to that project. Thank you for posting your out of sight collection. Think I will check out a local pipe show, and, check out some of the individuals who hand craft pipes. I have never been to one. In live just north of NYC. I collect old objects as well. You can see one here.
 

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JimInks

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Sales
Old Ted Award
Sir, I recently signed on with this group of cool, inveterate pipe smokers. It is easily noted that you are a discerning, dedicated pipe collector. Your special selections are marvelously artistic, and noted you have a possible bent for "comic art". It's quite coincidental in a stange way. Since retiring in 2013, I fell, quite by accident, into an acting career. Recently, A24 shot part of a feature film at our home, called "Funny Pages". Maybe you like comic art almost as much as you do pipes. https://a24films.com/films/funny-pages Here's A24 the link to that project. Thank you for posting your out of sight collection. Think I will check out a local pipe show, and, check out some of the individuals who hand craft pipes. I have never been to one. In live just north of NYC. I collect old objects as well. You can see one here.
I like that, especially being a big baseball fan and former semi-pro player. As for art, I was a fine artist selling work in galleries and museums before I became a comic book artist in 1992. I'll check out the link you posted. And thank you for the kind words.
 

JimInks

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Old Ted Award
Hey @JimInks come the end of the day... it was worth the effort.
still beautiful pipes sir!👌
It certainly was worth it.

Btw, here's a story about that Grabow pot:
Back when I was in college in the winter of 1981, school was closed due to snow for a couple of days. I was outside my dorm talking with a few friends when some girls started yelling at us and throwing snowballs. Naturally, we started throwing snowballs back at them. This one girl yells at me, "I'm gonna knock that pipe right out of your mouth!" Well, she couldn't hit me, but being a baseball player, I hit her multiple times, though I didn't throw them hard enough to hurt her. I guess she thought knocking a pipe out of my mouth was funny, but me hitting her with snowballs wasn't. She was pretty mad at me until I laughingly said, "You don't mess with a man's pipe in the snow." A few days later, when she -if you'll pardon another pun - cooled down, she asked me out for a date, saying, "Anybody with a sense of humor like yours deserves a dinner." We dated the rest of the school semester.
 

hild

Well-known member
Jim, are you ready for this? Guess what I did in my "green and salad days"*? I managed Hammer Galleries for Armand & Victor Hammer, at 51 E. 57th St. in Manhattan in the early 1970's! I was one of my early jobs as I started out. So, that's (2) coincidences we note, not including piping! (*Phrase borrowed from F. Maxfield Parrish via Coy Ludwig's table book, Maxfield Parrish.) Take a gander at the attached pic. Yep. It's a pip of a piper's fantasy! 2'4" x 8'6". Thank you for your note! PS, my Dad grew up in Harlem on the North West Side. He used to watch Lou Gehrig "hit homer after homer over the Baker Field wall." I asked Dad, when I was about 7-8 years old, "Gee, Dad, he was a great player, wasn't he?" Dad replied, "That man had legs on him like a Steinway piano"! Have a nice weekend, Sir. You made my day.
 

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JimInks

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Sales
Old Ted Award
Jim, are you ready for this? Guess what I did in my "green and salad days"*? I managed Hammer Galleries for Armand & Victor Hammer, at 51 E. 57th St. in Manhattan in the early 1970's! I was one of my early jobs as I started out. So, that's (2) coincidences we note, not including piping! (*Phrase borrowed from F. Maxfield Parrish via Coy Ludwig's table book, Maxfield Parrish.) Take a gander at the attached pic. Yep. It's a pip of a piper's fantasy! 2'4" x 8'6". Thank you for your note! PS, my Dad grew up in Harlem on the North West Side. He used to watch Lou Gehrig "hit homer after homer over the Baker Field wall." I asked Dad, when I was about 7-8 years old, "Gee, Dad, he was a great player, wasn't he?" Dad replied, "That man had legs on him like a Steinway piano"! Have a nice weekend, Sir. You made my day.
That's a really cool painting, man. Yeah, Gehrig had big legs and was built like a Greek God. It's sad that he had such an awful ending to his life.
 

ajl67

Well-known member
I never posted these Dr. Grabow Omegas. They were the closest I was able to come to getting a 4AB style back then. Amazing how things change over the years.

This was the first pipe I bought back in July 1974 for $2.49. I mowed a neighbor's lawn to get the two bucks I needed for it.
View attachment 161096

I bought this one in July of that year by collecting pop bottles and mowing another yard for $2.00. Bought some tobacco, too.
View attachment 161097

Bought this one in the summer of 1978 for $2.95. It's a tad smaller than the other two, and a little more expensive.
View attachment 161098

I bought this Grand Duke in January of 1979 when I was out playing in the snow with my then-girl friend, and needed a smoke. Paid $2.00 for it at the Piggly-Wiggly. What a terrible name for a store. Anyway, it smoked hot, and I sanded off the wax to get a cooler, better smoke.
View attachment 161099
Dude don't bag on the Pig! We had a few around Florida in the Orlando area as i recall.
 

ajl67

Well-known member
Piggly-Wiggly stores were good stores with lots of stuff, but the name was awful.
Without looking it up, i would say it was a little one off store in the south with a “cute” name and mascot pig and it grew from there, i mean i hope. 😂

ok I’m one of those ppl and had to learn.



Piggly Wiggly Beginning

Piggly Wiggly®, America's first true self-service grocery store, was founded in Memphis, Tennessee in 1916 by Clarence Saunders. In grocery stores of that time, shoppers presented their orders to clerks who then gathered the goods from the store shelves. Saunders, a dynamic and innovative man, noticed that this method resulted in wasted time and expense, so he came up with an unheard-of solution that would revolutionize the entire grocery industry: he developed a way for shoppers to serve themselves.

They have an interesting story and revolutionist the grocery business in half a dozen ways including refrigerated cases for produce, the more you know!


now to tie this back and on track do you remember if the pipes were behind the counter such as many cases today or were they out for you to paw through? There that will do nicely 😂
 

JimInks

Well-known member
Sales
Old Ted Award
Without looking it up, i would say it was a little one off store in the south with a “cute” name and mascot pig and it grew from there, i mean i hope. 😂

ok I’m one of those ppl and had to learn.



Piggly Wiggly Beginning

Piggly Wiggly®, America's first true self-service grocery store, was founded in Memphis, Tennessee in 1916 by Clarence Saunders. In grocery stores of that time, shoppers presented their orders to clerks who then gathered the goods from the store shelves. Saunders, a dynamic and innovative man, noticed that this method resulted in wasted time and expense, so he came up with an unheard-of solution that would revolutionize the entire grocery industry: he developed a way for shoppers to serve themselves.

They have an interesting story and revolutionist the grocery business in half a dozen ways including refrigerated cases for produce, the more you know!


now to tie this back and on track do you remember if the pipes were behind the counter such as many cases today or were they out for you to paw through? There that will do nicely 😂
They had the pipes on two backing boards attached to a metal rack behind the counter.
 

JimInks

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Sales
Old Ted Award
Here's a list of a few shapes I counted. I should done princes, lovats, billiards, freehands etc., but I focused on my favs. It was a lot of work as it was. Btw, I did not count silver spigots in the military mount category, although they certainly belong there.

Apples 23
Authors 13
Bings 7
Bulldogs 53
Canadian/Liverpool/ Lumbermans 30
Hungarians 12
Meerschaums 33
Military Mounts 71
Panels 15
Pokers 10
Pots 20
Rhodesians 19
Silver Spigots 11
Tomatoes 5
 
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