Loose or packed storage in Mason Jars?

Codgerindecline

Well-known member
I personally subscribe to the theory that it'll never be more affordable to buy tobacco than the present moment, and our cellars represent an investment, that investment isn't worth spit if we can't preserve our tobacco in smokable condition, which is the entire purpose of storage, any modification or improvement in taste is really secondary to that in my life
I agree 100%. As long as it is smokeable when we want to smoke it, all will be well.
 

SmokeRings

Well-known member
Patron
Wow we have a lot of varied opinions...My next part of this question is what matters most in your pack choice,
the cut (ribbon, cube. etc.) of the tobaccky or is it the type (english, vaper, aero, etc.) when you make your choice ???
It has been my experience that the flavors of Aromatic and Latakia based blends do not tend to last as long as other tobacco's when stored, it's not like you get flavorless smoke, but if you age a pouch of 1Q for a couple of years, then smoke a bowl of it, and then smoke a bowl of fresh stuff, you'll definitely notice a difference, that said you may prefer the way it tastes after a couple of years, if so, cellar it up and go to town, personally I don't cellar Aromatic blends, those that I do buy get smoked pretty quickly so that the strength of the toppings can be enjoyed.
 

Mrm1775

Well-known member
Sales
I only cellar 4 - 5 tobaccos - so I load the jars up without worrying about interrupting the aging process if I open a jar to get some. By that time it already has age on it and more importantly it's in my possession.

It goes something like this20210611_103320.jpg
 

Dquisenberry

Well-known member
Multiple industry people scratch their head and think we are crazy to think tobacco improves with age. Robert Germain is adamant that his doesn’t. But Greg Pease now says we need to let tobacco breathe, because we let wine breathe. So I guess that will be de rigueur soon enough.

I don’t know who Brian Levine is nor have I seen his CV or a list of publications in peer reviewed journals. I call pseudoscience.
Worked in the industry for 20 years (dunhill, smoking pipes, sutliff, MacBaren, etc). Has interviewed everyone in pipe industry on his pipesmagazine radio podcast over the last 5 years)
 

SmokeRings

Well-known member
Patron
Worked in the industry for 20 years (dunhill, smoking pipes, sutliff, MacBaren, etc). Has interviewed everyone in pipe industry on his pipesmagazine radio podcast over the last 5 years)
I think the point that is being got at is that the details of involvement matter, my mother's been involved in the medical field for 40 years, but she's not at all qualified to give a specialists opinion on any sort of medical conditions, because she handles billing, everyone is of course entitled to an opinion, but it doesn't count for any more than that unless there is some kind of verifiable data point which can be referenced, doesn't mean they have an invalid opinion, only that it is only an opinion, and not a scientific fact
 

Dquisenberry

Well-known member
I think the point that is being got at is that the details of involvement matter, my mother's been involved in the medical field for 40 years, but she's not at all qualified to give a specialists opinion on any sort of medical conditions, because she handles billing, everyone is of course entitled to an opinion, but it doesn't count for any more than that unless there is some kind of verifiable data point which can be referenced, doesn't mean they have an invalid opinion, only that it is only an opinion, and not a scientific fact
I’ve been accumulating and aging for 39 years. Maybe next year I’ll give my opinion on what I’ve experienced.
 

Codgerindecline

Well-known member
I’ve been accumulating and aging for 39 years. Maybe next year I’ll give my opinion on what I’ve experienced.
I suppose I started chasing and accumulating vintage tins around the same time, and certainly started storing bulk for aging not long after. Opinions on any number of aspects of those twin pursuits have always varied, always will. I am not impressed by my own experience as having revealed any great secrets, much less the opinions of others. Tobacco is an agricultural product, it will change over time, you might like the changes or not. If you think the results of your preferred aging technique have yielded a spectacular result, an equally knowledgeable smoker familiar with the blend to whom you offer a sample might think the results are terrible.

There are university level departments and schools of Viticulture. Since I am not terribly interested in wine, I don’t know this for sure, but I imagine that various “double blind” or similar studies have been done about aging and storage and published so that others in the field can confirm or contradict the findings. With pipe tobacco, every name I have seen proffered as an expert on aging, including that of Mr. Levine, seems to be from the marketing side of the industry. There actually is a great deal of scientific knowledge in the industr, as the troves of documents released under the Master Settlement Agreement showed, but I am not aware.that any of that scientific talent has been unleashed on the question of aging pipe tobacco.
 

Montag

Well-known member
I found a scientific article that may be related to this question, but I can't really understand it at first glance:

Expression of a Plastid-Targeted Flavodoxin Decreases Chloroplast Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Delays Senescence in Aging Tobacco Leaves

I love scientific jargon (ok I am a nerd). I really like the journals’s web address: www.frontiersin.org. I didn’t know there was a website discussing all sorts of good ol’ fashion “frontier sin”. “Frontiers in” is boring.
:hahaha-024:
 

Dquisenberry

Well-known member
I suppose I started chasing and accumulating vintage tins around the same time, and certainly started storing bulk for aging not long after. Opinions on any number of aspects of those twin pursuits have always varied, always will. I am not impressed by my own experience as having revealed any great secrets, much less the opinions of others. Tobacco is an agricultural product, it will change over time, you might like the changes or not. If you think the results of your preferred aging technique have yielded a spectacular result, an equally knowledgeable smoker familiar with the blend to whom you offer a sample might think the results are terrible.

There are university level departments and schools of Viticulture. Since I am not terribly interested in wine, I don’t know this for sure, but I imagine that various “double blind” or similar studies have been done about aging and storage and published so that others in the field can confirm or contradict the findings. With pipe tobacco, every name I have seen proffered as an expert on aging, including that of Mr. Levine, seems to be from the marketing side of the industry. There actually is a great deal of scientific knowledge in the industr, as the troves of documents released under the Master Settlement Agreement showed, but I am not aware.that any of that scientific talent has been unleashed on the question of aging pipe tobacco.
Well pat yourself on the back.