Low Expectations Brand That Pleasantly Surprised?

blackmouth210

Well-known member
Patron
#29
Retitle of this thread: If talking tobacco... Edward G. ROBINSON'S PIPE BLEND... introduced to me by @JimInks a few years ago, since, I never looked back. Best bought by the tub for both economy and keeping up a good stock. A solid pleasing blend!

If talking pipe, MM cobs always keep me pleasantly surprised.
Great stuff. I wish that were sold in bulk.
But at under $4 per oz pricing on the big tub, I'm not complaining.
 

Tedvig

Well-known member
#30
Retitle of this thread: If talking tobacco... Edward G. ROBINSON'S PIPE BLEND... introduced to me by @JimInks a few years ago, since, I never looked back. Best bought by the tub for both economy and keeping up a good stock. A solid pleasing blend!

If talking pipe, MM cobs always keep me pleasantly surprised.
After reading this thread, I revisited Edward g Robinson blend. I gotta say, it is a good smoke.
 

Russ H.

Fight The Good Fight
#31
In thinking about the "Old-Standby" pipes, and tobaccos from our past we must remember that there was a time where pretty much all pipe smokers saw pipes as nothing more than a vessel to burn tobacco. In our current world of "Artisan" pipes as we call them--this concept wasn't as strong as it is now. I got to thinking about this pretty in depth--I'm currently laid up with broken ribs--so I have time to think about--well--stuff. The day when most men simply smoked cobs, Kaywoodie's, Dr. Grabow's, and every now, and again meer's.
I remember when a few really nice shops opened where some imported pipes began to hit the market. They were pipes that a man had to think twice about due to cost. Heck forget the Dunhill pipes--in my neck of the country you would have had to go to places like Philly, Baltimore, Washington D.C., and the like to see those. In my area a man would have had to spend a weeks worth of pay to afford pipes like that. One name comes to mind that was considered a big deal in my childhood was "Bertram." While I never even thought about it in my youth the 14th street Bertram pipes were kind of like the Cadillac of pipes for those who wanted to step up. Also as time passed the Johnson pipe factory in Carlisle, Pa.. When I look at these names now--people--at least most don't even think bout these names today. I do see a few Bertram's listed on Ebay, but in reflection there were pipes that in our modern world today are rarely even talked about anymore, but in their day--they were regarded as really great pipes at least in my area.
 

Russ H.

Fight The Good Fight
#32
I wanted to add that my thoughts in posting what I did was that I never recalled hearing men complain about their pipes years ago. Discussions on drilling, button work, stem work, and all that as far as quality goes really never came up. To the men in my childhood they were just happy with the pipes they had that came from the drugs store, or hardware store in town. They smoked what ever tobacco they could. My Father, and I just had a discussion on this the other day. We talked about the available tobaccos that my Great Grand Father smoked. Bull Durham, and R.J. Reynolds in the little linen bags--they were living good--A new cob, or pipe picked off of the cardboard display every once in a while, and a few linen bags of tobacco when they went to town. We have came a long way since then. Just look at the choices we have now. It's like a giant sea of pipes, and blends to pick from these days--we are lucky pipers folks.
 
#33
I wanted to add that my thoughts in posting what I did was that I never recalled hearing men complain about their pipes years ago. Discussions on drilling, button work, stem work, and all that as far as quality goes really never came up. To the men in my childhood they were just happy with the pipes they had that came from the drugs store, or hardware store in town. They smoked what ever tobacco they could. My Father, and I just had a discussion on this the other day. We talked about the available tobaccos that my Great Grand Father smoked. Bull Durham, and R.J. Reynolds in the little linen bags--they were living good--A new cob, or pipe picked off of the cardboard display every once in a while, and a few linen bags of tobacco when they went to town. We have came a long way since then. Just look at the choices we have now. It's like a giant sea of pipes, and blends to pick from these days--we are lucky pipers folks.
I have been puffing on an old Grabow pretty much exclusively the last few weeks. It was a pleasant surprise to me as everyone always talks bad about them. It is a great pipe.
 

Russ H.

Fight The Good Fight
#36
I've had my eye on a Boswell pipe on eBay for months. Now I want to buy it more
The Boswell I just got when Makdragon, Billyjoe, and CLewis visited Boswells—I hand picked that pipe, and its a great pipe. There isn’t any tobacco I’ve put in it that smokes bad. Its a bent and passes a cleaner and passes my picky tests. It’s a pipe that is among my very best smokers, and I can say I own some lofty pipes.
 

Peeps

Well-known member
#40
I wanted to add that my thoughts in posting what I did was that I never recalled hearing men complain about their pipes years ago. Discussions on drilling, button work, stem work, and all that as far as quality goes really never came up. To the men in my childhood they were just happy with the pipes they had that came from the drugs store, or hardware store in town. They smoked what ever tobacco they could. My Father, and I just had a discussion on this the other day. We talked about the available tobaccos that my Great Grand Father smoked. Bull Durham, and R.J. Reynolds in the little linen bags--they were living good--A new cob, or pipe picked off of the cardboard display every once in a while, and a few linen bags of tobacco when they went to town. We have came a long way since then. Just look at the choices we have now. It's like a giant sea of pipes, and blends to pick from these days--we are lucky pipers folks.
A little off topic as far as pipes & tobaccos go, but your post reminded me of a discussion I had with Mom a couple of days ago.
She was seven when WWII started.
They went through the rationing of everything. Sugar, coffee, cloth for dresses (they used feedsack), tires, gasoline, and on and on and on.
Pa Colwell, her dad, smoked cigars & pipes.
I doubt he ever complained about the drill of a pipe stem while his son, my Uncle Bud, was off to war and not heard from for 4-6 months at a time.
On top of that, they were in Pampa, TX. , on the heels of the dust bowl.