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My first estate pipes

#1
For years I have read about the great estate pipes that many folks are finding. In the past few years I have been to numerous yard sales & flea markets & antique stores & such but have only seen a few pipes. None of those few pipes were worth buying and cleaning up. Either the style was not to my liking, they were beat up or broken, or the price was way too high.

Late last winter I was passing a little antique store that I have driven past hundreds of times but just never stopped in. On a whim I pulled into the parking lot and went in. I asked the owner if he had any pipes. He said only a few then he pulled out a cigar box with about 6 pipes and another box with maybe 10. $5 each he said. Here is what I grabbed.

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The top one is a Middleton in very good condition. Maybe one of you folks know what company actually made it? Friction stem with a stinger. Not smoked much.


The second one is a Kaywoodie 96. The stem is oxidized some but the wood finish is in excellent condition. The stem is screw in but it does not clock correctly when screwed in.

The third is a GBD, 867, London England. Again the stem is oxidized but the wood is in very good condition.

The fourth is a Peterson 314, Standard System I believe. (I am learning as I research these pipes.) And again, stem is oxidized but wood very good condition.

All of these pipes have rather nice grain. I would think that they were all owned by the same person. Very possibly the shop owner’s father. They look like they were lovingly cared for. Except the GBD has a rough area on the forward portion of the rim. As if it was tapped on something to knock the ashes out.

I went back a week later and grabbed these two pipes.

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The upper one is labeled “Forcaster, Imported briar”. A very small pipe. Screw in stem with a stinger. Looks much like the Kaywoodie.

The second one is only labeled “Hand Made Denmark”. Is there any way to determine what company made this pipe? The bit has a rather large tooth hole on the bottom. Trying to determine if that is something that I can fix or if it needs to go to an expert.

All but the Middleton & Forcaster are fairly heavily caked. I have been delving into cleaning them and have been asking questions about alcohol/salt soaking in the “Restoration and Maintenance” section.

I will post some after photos when they are finished. But since the exterior was taken care of the photos will not look very different.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
#5
The second one is only labeled “Hand Made Denmark”. Is there any way to determine what company made this pipe? The bit has a rather large tooth hole on the bottom. Trying to determine if that is something that I can fix or if it needs to go to an expert.
If it's only stamped "hand made Denmark," that was deliberate. It was probably sold as a low-price, entry-level pipe. Nothing wrong with that.

Look at the darn thing.

A handsome blast with what is fairly obviously a hand cut stem. Even this was their "entry level," un-stamped, option, it was a pretty fine pipe.
 

Kiowapipe

Well-known member
#6
Holy cow you got some good deals. I bet you'll really like that GBD. Take care when you're cleaning the stem on it- those little medallions can come out on you. Maybe don't bleach-soak that part of it, or if you do, put something on it to protect it.

Congratulations and have fun! Bringing old pipes back to life is very satisfying.
 

Kayro

Well-known member
#8
A very good buy on the pipes. You mentioned the stem did not clock correctly on the Kaywoodie. They were intentionaly made slightly left of center in order to compensate for wear. I have owned a few like that and have seen many more. If it is over clocked it can be a pain to get centered again. This is one of the reasons I prefer the older Grabows. The Grabows have the ajustomatic feature to align the stem and the stinger is removable. Not to malign your pipe. Kaywoodies are some fine smokers as I well know. I have a couple of estates that I smoke on a fairly regular basis.
 
#9
I did a little research after buying the first group and when I went back for the second two I told the shop owner that the pipes I bought were worth more than $5 each. I gave him $20 more which brings the price up to a whopping $10 each. He was pleased. Still a great bargan.

I wanted to develope a good relationship with him. He had said no one had ever asked for old pipes before so now he would keep an eye out for them.

As I am thinking about this, I need to visit the shop again and see what he has.