Peterson tobacco, will it change?

Ozark Wizard

Well-known member
Old Ted Award Winner
#2
Sure it will! Every tobacco recipe, heck EVERY recipe changes. You can use the same ingredients from the same place in the same kitchen using the same tools as others and different people and get varied product. It's like Grandma making Betty Crocker's Apple Pie recipe. Tell me my grandma didn't make the best pie.

I dare you.
 

mongo

Well-known member
#3
Sure it will! Every tobacco recipe, heck EVERY recipe changes. You can use the same ingredients from the same place in the same kitchen using the same tools as others and different people and get varied product. It's like Grandma making Betty Crocker's Apple Pie recipe. Tell me my grandma didn't make the best pie.

I dare you.
OK.... YOUR Grandma did NOT make the best apple pie. MY GRANDFATHER did! Hands down, the best apple pie that has ever been made, in the history of Earth, and even before that.
 

Peeps

Well-known member
#12
Sure it will! Every tobacco recipe, heck EVERY recipe changes. You can use the same ingredients from the same place in the same kitchen using the same tools as others and different people and get varied product. It's like Grandma making Betty Crocker's Apple Pie recipe. Tell me my grandma didn't make the best pie.

I dare you.
I make the best Apple Pie, though I don’t follow Betty Crocker.
 

Davidmackv

Well-known member
#15
I used to work at the Jif peanut butter plant in Lexington, Kentucky. The first 8 years I worked there it was owned by Proctor and Gamble, it was then sold to Smucker's, who I worked for 2 years. The quality control under Proctor and Gamble was elite, Smucker's not so much. So it did change. Working there for 10 years when I get into a new jar I can tell if it was made correctly or not, and more often it's not.
 

Sasquatch

Wizzard
Staff member
#16
We cracked a tin of Murray's-produced Old Dublin last year.
Smoker 1: "Wow, that's nice and mellow, really doesn't taste anything like I expected, a lot more harmonious and mellow than I remember."
Smoker 2: "Wow that has a lot more latakia in it than I figured, is this ever nice! Kinda plummy."
Smoker 3: "Bah, well past it's prime, and not a patch on how it used to taste."

So even if it doesn't change hands, the blends are a) experienced very differently by folks and b) kinda changing by themselves anyhow. The Murray's Old Dublin was practically juicy, and I remember the more recent version as kind of a dry, ascerbic smoke, basma in the mix, but never a sort of sweet/thick thing like the Murray's was (at this point).

The good news is that STG should be real good at making a bunch of these kind of blends - Connoisseur's Choice, Luxury Mixture etc. Right up their alley. Whether they manage a good version of Old Dublin or Irish Oak (now Irish Cask I guess), well... we'll see. The bad news is that the very best Peterson ever offered looks to be dead - the Signature Flake was worth fighting for.

Also agree that Nutty Cut was pretty good (stupid name though).

The tobacco industry baffles me. It's a bit like when the pizza parlour up the street that everyone loves gets bought by new owners, and the first thing they do is change the sign out front, then the menu, then the crust. And then they wonder why people don't come anymore.

Really what's happening now is there's only a few giant companies making pipe tobacco at all, and all the brands that they can scoop up mean market share. And with new stuff being difficult to release in the USA, old brand names (like Capstan and 3 nuns for example) have a little more power/appeal for them.
 

Sasquatch

Wizzard
Staff member
#18
Peterson tobaccos are now being made by STG rather than... whoever was making them before (KnK?). Dunhill tobacco names (and hopefully recipes) are being re-released as Peterson blends, presumably also made by STG. I don't know who made the dunhill blends before. But ostensibly, very little has changed except that Peterson is now Dunhill, Ireland is now Denmark, and there's still no Signature Flake.