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Pipe Rocks

Spillproof

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
Sales
#5
Don't they use those in those new Nording pipes?
They were commonly used on Dead Tour too.
Because where are you gonna find a screen in a parking lot?

I think this is a horrible idea.
Pipemakers work very very hard to not have any obstructions to flow. This seems like a recipe for gurgling and constantly feeling like you have leaf blockage.
 

taharris

Active member
Sales
#8
They were commonly used on Dead Tour too.
Because where are you gonna find a screen in a parking lot?

I think this is a horrible idea.
When we make pipes we work very very hard to not have any obstructions to flow.
This is a recipe for gurgling and constantly feeling like you have leaf blockage.

I agree. If the pipe is drilled properly there is no need to add gravel.

Todd
 

BubbaBriar

Well-known member
#9
Ok, curiosity made me try on my last bowl of the day. It's complete and utter snake oil, at least for me. The pebbles don't go down deep enough to do a damn thing. If they did it'd constrict airflow as you mentioned. Or if your smoking that wet to reach up to the pebbles you might as well use a bong. They did dump out looking the same way as they went in. If they do work for others great, but my try proved them useless for me.
 

Ozark Wizard

Well-known member
#10
They were commonly used on Dead Tour too.
Because where are you gonna find a screen in a parking lot?

I think this is a horrible idea.
When we make pipes we work very very hard to not have any obstructions to flow.
This is a recipe for gurgling and constantly feeling like you have leaf blockage.
Screens? Rest room faucet diffusers, of course! Back in the day there were like three in each tap. Steel wool worked the charm too.... And if you were willing to trim off an inch of speaker wire the copper strands made a decent impromptu screen.

Just sayin'...
 

Coastal Bend

Get off my lawn.
Patron
#11
I think the principle market for these was as a companion to the Nording Keystone pipes -- a kind of faux Falcon pipe with a plastic base and a briar bowl, that fits onto the base with an "O" ring. The cavity below the base has a little spiral wall winding around and the idea is to sprinkle some of these "rocks" there. Everyone thinks they have the "better mouse trap" -- er -- drier, better smoking pipe.

https://www.pipesandcigars.com/p/nording-eriksen-pipes-pipes/1484977/
 

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
Patron
#13
This item has been talked about before. I fully understand that through out the ages the concept of curing the moisture problem within a pipe has raged on.
Moisture is a product of combustion. How we control this has always been asked, and many times answered with all kinds of ideas--like these little clay rocks for instance.
I have learned that the cure for moisture is mainly not the pipe itself, but the person using said pipe.
As long as we have a pipe--drilled proper, with proper air flow, and passage along with a tobacco with proper moisture content we are off to a good start. From there the pace in which we smoke said pipe will often cure most, and many moisture issues. Unless a pipe is poorly constructed, and the tobacco is not properly dried to a decent level, and one puffs in a fast, and furious way--this will lead to a need to do something about too much moisture.
These clay rocks/pebbles are yet another idea, or concept to attempt to cure an age old problem that can be fixed by technique in many cases.
If your tobacco moisture level is near decent, and your pipe is made right, and your technique is some what decent, and you encounter moisture issues---look at these three things. If after all of that your pipe still gives you trouble---the pipe needs thrown into the nearest woodstove.
I will not make fun of anyone who desires to try such things, but I will not be using them, and if a specific pipe needs these to keep it from smoking wet--both the rocks, and the pipe---well---I'll need a pair of these pipes, and a tin of rock for each---this so as I drive down the road, and can wind down my window, and throw both pipes, and both tins of rocks down over a steep bank as I drive to my destination.
 

Ozark Wizard

Well-known member
#14
This item has been talked about before. I fully understand that through out the ages the concept of curing the moisture problem within a pipe has raged on.
Moisture is a product of combustion. How we control this has always been asked, and many times answered with all kinds of ideas--like these little clay rocks for instance.
I have learned that the cure for moisture is mainly not the pipe itself, but the person using said pipe.
As long as we have a pipe--drilled proper, with proper air flow, and passage along with a tobacco with proper moisture content we are off to a good start. From there the pace in which we smoke said pipe will often cure most, and many moisture issues. Unless a pipe is poorly constructed, and the tobacco is not properly dried to a decent level, and one puffs in a fast, and furious way--this will lead to a need to do something about too much moisture.
These clay rocks/pebbles are yet another idea, or concept to attempt to cure an age old problem that can be fixed by technique in many cases.
If your tobacco moisture level is near decent, and your pipe is made right, and your technique is some what decent, and you encounter moisture issues---look at these three things. If after all of that your pipe still gives you trouble---the pipe needs thrown into the nearest woodstove.
I will not make fun of anyone who desires to try such things, but I will not be using them, and if a specific pipe needs these to keep it from smoking wet--both the rocks, and the pipe---well---I'll need a pair of these pipes, and a tin of rock for each---this so as I drive down the road, and can wind down my window, and throw both pipes, and both tins of rocks down over a steep bank as I drive to my destination.
In a word.....

cob.
 

blackmouth210

Well-known member
#15
I have learned that the cure for moisture is mainly not the pipe itself, but the person using said pipe.

^^^THIS!!^^^

Most any gimmick "fix" for excess moisture becomes unnecessary when the pipe-smoker does his/her part.

Proper tobacco preparation, pipe selection, packing, and smoking technique will almost always fix the moisture issue.

For new pipers:
There is more than one way to do it right. But gimmicks are not part of the solution.
There's no shame in doing it wrong until you learn what works for you.
But, skip the gimmicks.
 
#18
I think the principle market for these was as a companion to the Nording Keystone pipes -- a kind of faux Falcon pipe with a plastic base and a briar bowl, that fits onto the base with an "O" ring. The cavity below the base has a little spiral wall winding around and the idea is to sprinkle some of these "rocks" there. Everyone thinks they have the "better mouse trap" -- er -- drier, better smoking pipe.

https://www.pipesandcigars.com/p/nording-eriksen-pipes-pipes/1484977/
I've used them in the Keystone pipe. They work OK if you don't use too many. They collect both tar and moisture and start to turn black and gooey after a couple of bowls.

Use too many, and the flavor turns weird. As I recall 5 or 6 little stones worked OK in the Keystone. More than 10 and there were problems. Never got them to work in a normal pipe.

Been awhile since I've smoked the Keystone.
 

CMAsailor

Foam makes water wetter.
Patron
#19
clay pebbles?...
I would caution use of any moisture wicking pebbles that can turn into mud...just seems like a recipe for... mud. and unless someone who has actually used the stuff successfully chimes in, I'm not so sure you're going to get much of a different suggestion. it just doesn't sound sound, but I've never used them either.

Meerschaum pebbles chunks or the like would be about the only moisture wicking pebble type product I wouldn't caution against using. but then again, even those products have excess dust that would be introduced to the smoke. and are generally cost prohibitive. the cost is why I probably never tried them when getting started in the hobby, and opted for the paper filters when I was getting started. looking back, some of those pipes just wouldn't smoke worth a darn and needed the filter until completely broken-in, after they were broken in, they didn't collect moisture so much.

Most of the time, I don't use a filter anymore, either my pipes wont accommodate them, or Ive re bored the shank for optimal smoking qualities if they did have a moisture thing going on, or they don't have the issue at all.

if they were given to you, what the heck, try them and see what happens, post your results? but I wouldn't try them in a favorite pipe. maybe try a brylon if you have one, can't you throw those in the dishwasher to clean em out? lol

Lots of good advice and thoughts above as well,
Best of luck,
Sailor
 

CMAsailor

Foam makes water wetter.
Patron
#20
I've used them in the Keystone pipe. They work OK if you don't use too many. They collect both tar and moisture and start to turn black and gooey after a couple of bowls.

Use too many, and the flavor turns weird. As I recall 5 or 6 little stones worked OK in the Keystone. More than 10 and there were problems. Never got them to work in a normal pipe.

Been awhile since I've smoked the Keystone.
awesome reply, :puffy: