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Pipe users / tobacco chamber

#21
I hand-cut bowls on my own pipes, and let the wood decide how big the bowl will be. My smallest is a squarish 1"diameter bowl 1 1/4" deep. My biggest is 1 1/4 x 1 3/4.
I rarely smoke the big one...it eats a lot of tobacco and requires a lot of patience to properly light.
My more recent pipes have seen me experimenting with cone or v shaped bowls, but I still prefer to cut the bowl by hand rather than drilling.
My bought pipes are no smaller than 3/4 inch diameter, but I have to +1 everything @Grrrrr609 said.
 

PipeRusak

pipes with raisins
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#22
Absolutely agree with you. Often people buy things not from the company, but from the seller. Communication is important.
Im all over the place. I have tiny nosewarmer pipes with small chambers and huge hulking 4 maximus pipes that hold a half a tin of tobacco. I smoke a little bit of everything. I use to smoke Tambo in a massive morretti. So I keep 3 pipes at work. I grab which ever pipe by what i want to smoke. Hercules 320 for english. a small bare bones for Vas and a savinelli poker that i opened up the chamber for aros. Chamber size doesnt matter to me. you had me any pipe and ill find a tobacco to pack in it.

More important to me is the carver. If walk up to your table in Chicago, and we have a nice conversation, Im more apt to buy your pipe. If you just shove a pipe at me and say buy it its my last pipe and you just want to leave, (this actually happened) I will never buy your pipe because i will never smoke it. I wont smoke it cuz i will always think how you treated me like an ::ass::. On the other hand, if we are friends, i will always buy your pipes because i will smoke them alot because ill think about our friendship and enjoy the pipe. I bought a pipe in Chicago this year that i absolutely hate the shape of. But the pipe was beautiful and the carver is a good friend. And i love smoking it.

A pipe is a vessel in which to smoke tobacco. (not my quote and i dont remember who said it or where) Hand me a cob, or a $800.00 piece of art. But sit with me and share tobacco, and that pipe will be a favorite.
Absolutely agree with you. Often people buy things not from the company, but from the seller. Communication is important.
 

PipeRusak

pipes with raisins
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#23
I hand-cut bowls on my own pipes, and let the wood decide how big the bowl will be. My smallest is a squarish 1"diameter bowl 1 1/4" deep. My biggest is 1 1/4 x 1 3/4.
I rarely smoke the big one...it eats a lot of tobacco and requires a lot of patience to properly light.
My more recent pipes have seen me experimenting with cone or v shaped bowls, but I still prefer to cut the bowl by hand rather than drilling.
My bought pipes are no smaller than 3/4 inch diameter, but I have to +1 everything @Grrrrr609 said.
Can I look at the photos of your hand cut tobacco cameras? It will be great if you show a photo in the process of working on the camera. Interesting to see, thank
 

RedScot

Well-known member
#28
20181011_121939.jpg 20181011_122031.jpg
Top and center are conical bowls, but the pipe on the bottom is squarish.
The Paleopipe (top) was an odd little piece of oak root that was really asymmetric, but still seemed to want to be a pipe; the bowl had to fit the contours of the wood, which I could only do with chisel.
The Jumboak (bottom) was another piece of oak root, and the second bowl I cut by hand. It's not perfectly circular, but I enjoy the process well enough to keep doing it.
In the center is the first plateau - and first briar - I've tried working. The bowl starts at 1" diameter and is 1 7/8" deep. Briar is tremendously tough wood, but I always strop my chisels before starting and use a whetstone when needed.
Of course, all that was before I cut the end of my thumb off in July. Since then I've only just now started carving again. The bone has effectively healed but there's a lot of nerve damage that makes it painful to carve for long at a stretch, but I enjoy the challenges of carving too much to revert to power tools. The immediate connection of putting my energy directly into the wood is very rewarding.
I've got a couple of pieces of olivewood that are seasoning, too, but I haven't started any carving on them yet.
 

PipeRusak

pipes with raisins
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#29
View attachment 15199 View attachment 15200
Top and center are conical bowls, but the pipe on the bottom is squarish.
The Paleopipe (top) was an odd little piece of oak root that was really asymmetric, but still seemed to want to be a pipe; the bowl had to fit the contours of the wood, which I could only do with chisel.
The Jumboak (bottom) was another piece of oak root, and the second bowl I cut by hand. It's not perfectly circular, but I enjoy the process well enough to keep doing it.
In the center is the first plateau - and first briar - I've tried working. The bowl starts at 1" diameter and is 1 7/8" deep. Briar is tremendously tough wood, but I always strop my chisels before starting and use a whetstone when needed.
Of course, all that was before I cut the end of my thumb off in July. Since then I've only just now started carving again. The bone has effectively healed but there's a lot of nerve damage that makes it painful to carve for long at a stretch, but I enjoy the challenges of carving too much to revert to power tools. The immediate connection of putting my energy directly into the wood is very rewarding.
I've got a couple of pieces of olivewood that are seasoning, too, but I haven't started any carving on them yet.
Uhh .. I really wish you got hurt.
In my youth I studied as a cabinetmaker and I know very well how sharp tools can be dangerous. As I remember, the master always told us "a well-sharpened instrument is less likely to get hurt."
I completely agree with you that Briar is a dense and strong material. These briar abilities open up a lot of opportunities for rustication.
It is more difficult to work with soft wood. How much time does it take for you to cut one tobacco chamber?
From tools for cutting did not try to use "ложкорез" ?
 

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RedScot

Well-known member
#33
Uhh .. I really wish you got hurt.
In my youth I studied as a cabinetmaker and I know very well how sharp tools can be dangerous. As I remember, the master always told us "a well-sharpened instrument is less likely to get hurt."
I completely agree with you that Briar is a dense and strong material. These briar abilities open up a lot of opportunities for rustication.
It is more difficult to work with soft wood. How much time does it take for you to cut one tobacco chamber?
From tools for cutting did not try to use "ложкорез" ?
Cut my thumb on a table saw, not a chisel. I've got a coated steel mesh glove I use when carving, but I just ran out to the saw to make one cut on a bayonet blank. Leather wasn't any obstacle to the saw...of course the mesh glove wouldn't have helped much either.
Using just chisels I can get a bowl done in briar in just an afternoon. Oak takes much less time - the Jumboak only took 90 minutes or so.
Ive never seen a tool like that. Do you know how it would be spelled in Enlish?
 

WalkinStick

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#34

PipeRusak

pipes with raisins
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#35
Another question with many answers.

Of all my pipes, probably only 2 or 3 are over 40-45~ grams. I prefer them to be less than 35g when it can be helped.
Many different answers are good !!! We are all different and we all have our own preferences.
Agree with me, if you often have to clamp the pipe in the teeth, then the weight of the pipe is of great importance. If there are no steel jaws :)
For small and medium cameras, making a light pipe is not a problem.

I also want to expand my knowledge of the preferences of smokers of large chambers and pipes
 

PipeRusak

pipes with raisins
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#36
Cut my thumb on a table saw, not a chisel. I've got a coated steel mesh glove I use when carving, but I just ran out to the saw to make one cut on a bayonet blank. Leather wasn't any obstacle to the saw...of course the mesh glove wouldn't have helped much either.
Using just chisels I can get a bowl done in briar in just an afternoon. Oak takes much less time - the Jumboak only took 90 minutes or so.
Ive never seen a tool like that. Do you know how it would be spelled in Enlish?
I am not sure that when you search for this tool in English you will get the correct answer. Perhaps this is a national tool.
This tool is used by woodcarvers for cutting spoons, bowls, etc. Therefore, I specifically in brackets wrote the correct name in Russian. Copy the name of the tool in Google. Now I’ll see a link to the video how these tools work.
 

PipeRusak

pipes with raisins
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#37
Cut my thumb on a table saw, not a chisel. I've got a coated steel mesh glove I use when carving, but I just ran out to the saw to make one cut on a bayonet blank. Leather wasn't any obstacle to the saw...of course the mesh glove wouldn't have helped much either.
Using just chisels I can get a bowl done in briar in just an afternoon. Oak takes much less time - the Jumboak only took 90 minutes or so.
Ive never seen a tool like that. Do you know how it would be spelled in Enlish?
 
#39
This is an interesting question and I, like quite a few others above, have pipes of several sizes. I guess I have to look at what i smoke the most and they would be mid size pipes because most of the time I prefer clenching.

For chamber width 3/4 to 7/8 seems to be the majority. I like anywhere from 1 1/2 to 1 3/4” in depth.

I love to smoke a conical bowl, but reaming them sucks, so I usually will avoid them for that reason alone.