Pipe weight, and size?

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
#1
Do any of you folks, or have any of you moved onto pipes of lighter weight. I can tolerate heavy, but for what I call arm chair use--not clenching.
My Beloved recently has gifted me a pipe--normal in size--light as a feather, and of normal size--80" diameter x 1.40" deep--pipe weighs in at a wopping .90 ounces.
She surprised me as she knew I had been looking at it, and knew I wouldn't pull the trigger. She said--a gift because she knew it would mean so much.
I have light weight pipes, but this one blows my mind for size vs. weight, balance is wonderful. I can't post pictures right now. It's a estate Rad.
I have, and love my light weight pipes for clenching, but wonder just how many others prefer pipes weighing in a near 1 lonely ouce. I like no more than about 1.50-1.80 ounces for clenching, and like them nearing closer to one ounce these days--what say you folks--is it hard finding a light weight briar pipe in normal dimensions--say a bowl around .80 diameter, and some decent depth to it?
 

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
#5
The pipe she gave me totally caught me off guard. I mean--this was something I figured when it caught my eye that I could never do this because of other things currently. She said she had a little stash put back, and wanted me to have it because she caught me looking at it many times over. I said to myself--I can't afford it. Low, and behold she made it happen. It was a estate pipe over at SP. A Rad blasted Dublin they had. I cannot believe the weight to size ratio. Its drilled, and spot on perfect all the way around, and who ever had it took mighty fine care of it.
I own several really light pipes, but they also are light because of reduced size. When I say light I mean very light at one ounce, or less.
This pipe has a balance, and button along with its weight like you don't even know its there.
I'll cherish this one. I'd have never bought it because in my mind I simply can't afford it right now, and as I said--it caught me totally off guard.
I love all pipes, but never really had one that the size to weight ratio is like this.
 

Sorringowl

Pretty much as free as a bird.
Sales
#8
While I normally prefer pipes that weigh in the 1.5 to 2.0 ounce range, I do have some heavier pipes that, because they're balanced so well, are just as easy (if not easier) to clench. An old, W.O. Larsen, and a vintage Ardor both come to mind, both, over 2 oz (the ardor, almost 3 ounces). For me, anything an ounce or under just feels too light, but again, for me, it really depends on the balance of the pipe, rather than the weight alone.

Your wife sounds like a gem. Congrats (on both, the pipe and the wife).
 

Coastal Bend

Get off my lawn.
Patron
#12
At the risk of de-railing talk about "featherweights" made me think -- for some reason -- about beer mugs.

Thinking back to the '70s when some bars were switching to plastic mugs and pitchers for beer, while others still had the traditional glass. After a time at a place with glass mugs and traveling for a change of scenery to another place we'd be served in identical looking plastic mugs. I don't recall anyone actually throwing the lighter mug over their shoulder but I personally remember some near misses -- mostly depending on how many glass mugs had been -- um -- hoisted already.

I don't imagine switching to a featherweight pipe causes any lift problems or embarrassing moments.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
#16
60 grams is the end of the line for me, I clench 90% of the time and I have dentures.
I ain't got dentures, but 60 grams ain't too far off my own limit, on a deep bent. I've got a couple of 3 oz pipes that I can clench while I type on the work laptop, but I don't hold them for hours at a time.

Those among us who insist on genuine featherweights tend to prefer a straight pipe. I'm with them, on that.

I can't stand a straight pipe over an ounce.
 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Well-known member
#17
At the risk of de-railing talk about "featherweights" made me think -- for some reason -- about beer mugs.

Thinking back to the '70s when some bars were switching to plastic mugs and pitchers for beer, while others still had the traditional glass. After a time at a place with glass mugs and traveling for a change of scenery to another place we'd be served in identical looking plastic mugs. I don't recall anyone actually throwing the lighter mug over their shoulder but I personally remember some near misses -- mostly depending on how many glass mugs had been -- um -- hoisted already.

I don't imagine switching to a featherweight pipe causes any lift problems or embarrassing moments.
I have encountered the horror of the plastic mug only once, and I left that establishment post-haste.

p.s. I miss glass "schooners"
 

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
#19
I too enjoy pipes in all ranges. I too totally agree that balance, and also button comfort plays a huge role in the pipe itself. I have some pretty hefty ones that do well as arm chair pipes, and a few in the 1.80 ounce range I can easily clench due to balance.
I find myself though really enjoying the super light weight pipes in the smaller sizes many times.
For me this is the first pipe where pretty much everything is spot on with balance, and button, and a very light weight, yet the pipe itself as far as size, and bowl size is still pretty generous. it isn't what I would term as "feeling-funny" due to lack of heft, but I'm finding I guess what I will call "not-so-cumbersome."
I also haven't seen many pipes with a generous bowl size, and size in general that are super light weight.
I often wonder about the actual briar characteristics in these pipes. What is it with the material that happened during its growth, or curing that has allowed it to be so light weight?
I tend to ponder stuff that maybe seems dumb, but I find it unique that from pipe to pipe with all things being pretty much close in shape, and size how some can weigh quite a bit more. For me I can really tell this as I clench most times, and it doesn't take long for me to tell whether the pipe isn't quite right--at least for me. Weight, balance, and buttons play a huge roll in a pipes over all quality for me.
 

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
#20
I too enjoy pipes in all ranges. I too totally agree that balance, and also button comfort plays a huge role in the pipe itself. I have some pretty hefty ones that do well as arm chair pipes, and a few in the 1.80 ounce range I can easily clench due to balance.
I find myself though really enjoying the super light weight pipes in the smaller sizes many times.
For me this is the first pipe where pretty much everything is spot on with balance, and button, and a very light weight, yet the pipe itself as far as size, and bowl size is still pretty generous. it isn't what I would term as "feeling-funny" due to lack of heft, but I'm finding I guess what I will call "not-so-cumbersome."
I also haven't seen many pipes with a generous bowl size, and size in general that are super light weight.
I often wonder about the actual briar characteristics in these pipes. What is it with the material that happened during its growth, or curing that has allowed it to be so light weight?
I tend to ponder stuff that maybe seems dumb, but I find it unique that from pipe to pipe with all things being pretty much close in shape, and size how some can weigh quite a bit more. For me I can really tell this as I clench most times, and it doesn't take long for me to tell whether the pipe isn't quite right--at least for me. Weight, balance, and buttons play a huge roll in a pipes over all quality for me.