Refinish or Unfinish this Peterson Spigot?

Chico

Well-known member
#1
This pipe must have been smoked a lot with sweaty hands and left on its side in the sun. The stain on one side is faded and visibly much lighter than the other side (more pronounced in real life than in the pics). That makes it pretty ugly overall.

I've had decent luck with other faded pipes, oiling repeatedly on the light side and it gradually evens out a bit. But this seems too far gone for that. So I'm thinking of just stripping it down and just leaving it the natural unfinished wood. The last pic is the what I'm thinking of, and the look I'd be going for. What say you?
 

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FrankHall

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#3
it all depends on what's under the finish..... if it cleans down to a nice natural.... cool .... if not, stain hides many a sin
What @Yosemite said. I would pour on some Murphy's Oil liberally and scrub the hell out of it with a toothbrush, especially on the darker side to get some of the stain off. As you know, Danish Oil will darken it and make the difference look less pronounced. Depending on how big the difference is at that point, you could either use the Darker Danish Oil, which I bet would make it look great, or add stain first, then the neutral Danish Oil.

Just guessing, as there's no telling what it will look like after you scrub it.
 

Chico

Well-known member
#4
What @Yosemite said. I would pour on some Murphy's Oil liberally and scrub the hell out of it with a toothbrush, especially on the darker side to get some of the stain off. As you know, Danish Oil will darken it and make the difference look less pronounced. Depending on how big the difference is at that point, you could either use the Darker Danish Oil, which I bet would make it look great, or add stain first, then the neutral Danish Oil.

Just guessing, as there's no telling what it will look like after you scrub it.
I'll do that (y) Danish oil is a nice idea if the "natural" approach doesn't work out.

Assuming I'm gonna keep going after the Murphy's, what's best for fully removing the finish, acetone?
 

FrankHall

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#5
I'll do that (y) Danish oil is a nice idea if the "natural" approach doesn't work out.

Assuming I'm gonna keep going after the Murphy's, what's best for fully removing the finish, acetone?
Yes, but I have never used enough of it to fully strip stain from wood. The problem you will run into is that to get the stain off, you'll lose the smooth sand-blasted look - the wood will end up looking rougher as the moisture is drawn out. So you'll have to add some sort of sealer to revitalize the wood. I know some people just go straight to a wax or balm, skipping the sealer. I've never done that, but I've seen good results from going straight to the 'before & after' balm. Not sure what's in that stuff, but probably some sort of oil that a beeswax or carnuba doesn't have.
 

Riff Raff

Well-known member
#9
A pipe restoration friend uses this process as well:
-Remove the wax with Murphys wood soap and hot water. (Keep it out of the inside of the pipe
unless you want your tobacco to taste like pine sol)
-Mix a thick batch of oxyclean and hot water.
Use just enough water to dilute the powder.
-Add 91% alcohol into the mix, and give the strummel a
few good scrubs with 0000 steel wool. The fine steel wool wont scratch the briar if used with a
gentle hand.
-Use a rag around the stampings not the steel wool
 

FrankHall

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#10
A pipe restoration friend uses this process as well:
-Remove the wax with Murphys wood soap and hot water. (Keep it out of the inside of the pipe
unless you want your tobacco to taste like pine sol)
-Mix a thick batch of oxyclean and hot water.
Use just enough water to dilute the powder.
-Add 91% alcohol into the mix, and give the strummel a
few good scrubs with 0000 steel wool. The fine steel wool wont scratch the briar if used with a
gentle hand.
-Use a rag around the stampings not the steel wool
I deleted my post, as I've since searched your blogs for a description of how to strip stain and finish off briar, and found a wonderful detailed blog 'ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS: How do I strip a finish from a pipe?' that I wish I had searched for long ago, as it answers many of my questions and the one @Chico asked as well. Great stuff - thanks for making your knowledge readily available to us.

Scott
 
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RDPipes

Mental Illness is a Terrible thing to Waste!
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#11
I think I'd just try to darken up the one side to match the other. I'd clean'er up with Murphy's Oil Soap and add just a touch of oil to the lighter side and see if it brings it back.
If not, wipe it down with 99% alcohol to remove any oils and try to match up the stain with alcohol base stain.
 

RDPipes

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#14
So @RDPipes and @Riff Raff - do you think going for the unfinished natural look isn't feasible?
Personally, I would just try to match the stain. I dislike natural finish, because there is no finish, it just gets dirty from what ever may be on your hands and is impossible to clean off.
Meers are different and aren't briar, I say keep them that way.
 

FrankHall

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#15
Personally, I would just try to match the stain. I dislike natural finish, because there is no finish, it just gets dirty from what ever may be on your hands and is impossible to clean off.
Meers are different and aren't briar, I say keep them that way.
I feel the same way, but I still want to completely strip a rusticated briar pipe and then saturate well with neutral Danish Oil - I have a feeling it will look great.
 

RDPipes

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#18
I guess I just can't wrap my brain around a wood item that will be used and handled by human hands, that is nothing but wood.

Is that what the Rogha pipes are? and the new laser-etched imitation of that 'non-finish' that Peterson recently released? If so, no thanks.
Haven't heard of either one so I couldn't tell you. I don't keep up too much with pipe manufacturing, I reckon I'm in my own little world here and only
see what appears on the forum and on Instagram. Don't keep up with new tobacco blends either, I know what I like and generally stick to them unless offered
something else. I don't watch the news either, word of mouth gives me enough worries. LOL!
 

FrankHall

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#20
@Chico - Here's one that shows the effect of scrubbing with Murphy's oil. On the right is the scrubbed pipe. On the left is after applying neutral Danish Oil and then b&a balm. The resulting color is very close to what it looked like before I scrubbed it, but a little less red. So the oil does darken it a little, but there's also obviously stain remaining after scrubbing.

Just an FYI since you seem curious.

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