Smoking in the house?

Russ H.

Fight The Good Fight
#42
Even now that my Wife has passed away I don't smoke in my house. Yes--I could if I wanted, but have chosen not to. I know what it was like to to scrub down rough plaster walls, and ceilings after a family member had passed. He smoked a pipe, and El Producto cigars in the house. That was a job I wouldn't wish on anyone to have to clean up.
I will never smoke, or allow it in my house.
 

Fritz

Well-known member
#43
From what I have read pipe smoke is not nearly as bad as other smokeables at leaving detectable odors or residue behind. Not sure if that is true. This thread seems to indicate odors and such were left behind by combo smokers; pipes and something else. If I smoke inside I use a small electric air filter/cleaner and that seems to make the wife happy.
 

CoreyR

Insane Asylum, head nut speaking!
#46
It is MY house, MY truck, MY car. I smoke where I danged well please and thank no man for the right. If somebody comes along after me and gets upset about it, they can piss off.
This is something that really irks me. Just another erosion of our freedoms because someone is "offended."
 

Coastal Bend

Get off my lawn.
Patron
#47
I smoke in the house, always have. Don't recall any issues with past houses.

This brings to mind when dad bought a new car in the 1950s. I asked if he was going to have vinyl coverings on the seats. It seemed like all the "cool kids" family cars had vinyl on the car seats -- and, in fact, on the sofa in the living room, too.

Quite simply dad said, "I bought this car for us -- not someone else"
 

Rodfather

Misty, Fetch !
#48
I smoke in the house, always have. Don't recall any issues with past houses.

This brings to mind when dad bought a new car in the 1950s. I asked if he was going to have vinyl coverings on the seats. It seemed like all the "cool kids" family cars had vinyl on the car seats -- and, in fact, on the sofa in the living room, too.

Quite simply dad said, "I bought this car for us -- not someone else"
Ah, Costal you are an oldie like me, I remember all of that. That vinyl on the sofa was uncomfortable but made it kid proof. Mother was so proud of it, same thing with the car seats.
 
#54
I mostly avoided this when the kids were young. Then I avoided it because we have a nice house we might want to sell some day. Then I considered building an ultra-ventilated smoking room.

Now I’m at a point where it’s getting in the way of my enjoyment and relaxation. Let’s play a hypothetical game... say I set aside $10k-15k for wall washing and paint for the someday when we sell. Is there any other big issue with indoor smoking? Is Killz + paint + carpet cleaning enough, or am I looking at a gut & remodel to “repair” my house after, say, a decade of indoor pipe smoking?

Especially interested in those who’ve sold a home after many years of indoor smoking. Today you may as well declare running a meth lab inside for the way realtors and non-smoking buyers view a property.

Thanks!
It's not any fuc&ing business of any buyer. It's YOUR house to do with what you want to.
 

SmokeRings

Well-known member
Patron
#57
I smoke lightly in the house, and do so "free range"

I smoke compulsively in my garage, this is also coincidentally where most of my time is spent while home. I made the mistake of having a cigar in the house once too, took ages to clear out, I don't do that anymore, those are either outside or in the garage. I have no particular interest in selling this house, but I doubt it becomes a problem if I do.
 

Olmstead

Well-known member
PSD Slow Smoke Winner
#60
Is Killz + paint + carpet cleaning enough, or am I looking at a gut & remodel to “repair” my house after, say, a decade of indoor pipe smoking?
First of all, if you're not smoking indoors at least some of the time, then you're missing out on the best kind of smoking (quiet, relaxing, wind-free, etc.), especially if you live in a temperate climate with cold winters. I like to sit quietly and comfortably when I smoke my pipe, and here in New England, that comfort is typically found indoors.

I highly doubt you'd need to gut your home just because you smoked a pipe in there for ten years. Cigars are a different story, and cigarettes yet another. If you have common American sheetrock + plaster + paint walls and sheetrock + plaster ceilings, they will definitely yellow over time; the higher they are, the slower they'll discolor. The discoloration on my ceilings is more noticeable than the smell in my case, but that's likely from my basic ventilation.

Having even just one route of ventilation - and a window cracked open just a bit for fresh air intake - helps the smell a lot. I just replaced a blower fan which ran constantly on medium speed for over two years ($40), and the impeller blades had a thick shellac of smoke residue on them. I'd say it did its job! I smoke on the floor below the main level and my front door and nobody ever notices the smell (I ask often).

It cost me >$100 and an afternoon to install a blower, just like you'd have in a bathroom ceiling. Even running a simple and cheap window fan during the warmer months will cut down on smoke damage.

For a bit of reference, I've been smoking a pipe one to ten times daily in the same two rooms for three years, and there is faint but noticeable yellowing on the plaster ceilings where I sit most often. I also noticed yellowing on the edges of some notebooks I keep near my smoking desk. Again, that's from three years of daily smoking with average to minimal ventilation.

Happy Smoking!