What's new

Stem Casting

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
@Sir Saartan ..
.. your little girl is so adorable. You are indeed a very blessed person.
yes I am!!! And her personality is even more adorable than her looks!!! She is a real princess,
in that she loves to make people smile.

I absolutely love the one in the upper left, the dark red crimson with the black swirled in. That's fabulous.
then I'll send you that. It's a mix of red brown and copper. The swirls look black in the picture, but it's actually
sparkling copper.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
I absolutely love the one in the upper left, the dark red crimson with the black swirled in. That's fabulous.
the top one in the middle is the exact same, but I didn't do as good of a job polishing it.

I did some basic polishing so the colours would come out somewhat, but:
a) all have some swirls in them, it's just barely visible because I'm such a bad photographer
b) the colours are quite a bit brighter than in that picture... yeah the blue one is really scary...
unless a smurf ordered a pipe from you, I'm not sure that's gonna end up as a pipe stem.
might make a nice ball pen for your youngest child though.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
View attachment 13398

Right now I'm smoking a very satisfying pipeful of Lane 1-Q in my Grezza 320 and my pipe is raised before me in honor of you @Sir Saartan .. may your continued success be an inspiration to many.
thank you my friend. I'm wondering where you keep coming up with these things, but you're right with every one of them.
me, I couldn't really answer what drives me when I'm doing all the stuff that I'm doing. it's just who I am.

My dad btw used to smoke a pipe and he was kind of surprised when he found out I made pipes. really liked them.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
One thing I notices as well: if you use less hardener, the blocks are less brittle BUT be absolutely certain to really
mix that stuff well. If you don't, there are going to be some spots where that resin will harden to the point where it is like
gum, but no more. obviously that block's for the garbage.

Also: the polyester resin does heat up while drying, and if you use too much hardener or cast too thick of a brick
the thing will start boiling in the middle. that of cause means you're gonna end up with bubbles in the very middle
of your block, meaning that one might be ruined as well.

so polyesther casting is something you need to fiddle with a little until you get perfect results.
 

321 One

Well-known member
the top one in the middle is the exact same, but I didn't do as good of a job polishing it.

I did some basic polishing so the colours would come out somewhat, but:
a) all have some swirls in them, it's just barely visible because I'm such a bad photographer
b) the colours are quite a bit brighter than in that picture... yeah the blue one is really scary...
unless a smurf ordered a pipe from you, I'm not sure that's gonna end up as a pipe stem.
might make a nice ball pen for your youngest child though.
The iceberg image was just something I downloaded from Internet; I typed in 'success', clicked images, and there it was, and so I can't take credit for that. I have always loved the imagery of what an iceberg represents. Many years ago, I was studying education on an undergraduate level and the iceberg model of language acquisition was often employed as an illustrative image. When language becomes evident with a word or two, what lies below the surface is perhaps 90% of that which was developing, and not yet evident, but fundamental to the development. This applies to many things in life, and your success at pipe making and stem casting is a good example.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
@321 One my friend you may not deserve credit for making that picture, but you know when
to go look for one and you chose the right one.

your success at pipe making and stem casting is a good example
it's funny how you guys all think I'm being successfull. Sometimes I feel I'm getting more credit for the things I
produce than I deserve.

on a subjective level, I am of course successfull, because these projects give me exactly what I was
looking for when I started them:

a) a hobby that is easy to fit into a ever changing time table. I'm a very busy person and
I simply can't have a hobby that needs me to be at a certain place at a certain time every week
b) an activity that is challenging, yet not to an extent where it's more work than fun
c) something where I can be creative
d) I like hobbies where at the end you actually have something to show for your work

I've got all of that, although the stem casting hobby is a little bit more challenging than
the pipe making in itself. The problem is that the tools I have are not made to handle any
delicate things. basically, my belt sander will make a bunch of sand out of a rod in a minute and a half,
it's just impossible to even get a rough outline of a stem.

That means I either need to invest in a lathe or go the time consuming way and use files. I'll probably
start with the second before eventually spending the money on the first. Like my mom I just like power tools.
 
Last edited:

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
one problem for me is the use of teflon tenons. I bought a variety of them, so it should be easy: drill a hole
in the stem, glue the thing in and be done with it.

unfortunately, I have not found a glue that will let me do that. And I have used several kinds of glue/ primer
combination that all were made to glue teflon. the problem is: they were not. none of them worked. even
if I let the darn thing dry for a couple of days.

and I can tell you it's no fun trying to make a completely round tenon with only files and sandpaper. nope,
not fun.
 

Wooda

Well-known member
one problem for me is the use of teflon tenons. I bought a variety of them, so it should be easy: drill a hole
in the stem, glue the thing in and be done with it.

unfortunately, I have not found a glue that will let me do that. And I have used several kinds of glue/ primer
combination that all were made to glue teflon. the problem is: they were not. none of them worked. even
if I let the darn thing dry for a couple of days.

and I can tell you it's no fun trying to make a completely round tenon with only files and sandpaper. nope,
not fun.
Nothing adheres to teflon. You need to have a mechanical lock
Cut gouges into the walls around the circumference of the hole in your stem. Cut gouges into the circumference of the teflon tenon.

Untitled.jpg Apply 24 hour, 2 part epoxy to both surfaces and press together.

Ream out the airway by hand with a drill bit after epoxy has partially set

When the epoxy cures, it will lock the tenon in place