The Great Mylar Migration

Ozark Wizard

Well-known member
Old Ted Award Winner
#21
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Ran out of bags (50) and I have 6 tins left. The Montgomery is 8oz. These are pint bags and you can fit 4oz in them if you smoosh it. The other is from a 2oz tin. It’s more labor intensive than jars (I don’t clean my jars, just use them new). If you have flakes , the little trays that hold the flakes help funnel them into the bag. Iron on its hottest setting.
Wow, that's slick! Very nice labeling too.:thumb-yello:
 

millarddj

Perpetual whippersnapper
Patron
#22
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Ran out of bags (50) and I have 6 tins left. The Montgomery is 8oz. These are pint bags and you can fit 4oz in them if you smoosh it. The other is from a 2oz tin. It’s more labor intensive than jars (I don’t clean my jars, just use them new). If you have flakes , the little trays that hold the flakes help funnel them into the bag. Iron on its hottest setting.
Wow, that's terrific! I have not done any real labeling - just Sharpie scrawl on my bags. Did you just print paper labels and tape over?

Great looking stash.
 

millarddj

Perpetual whippersnapper
Patron
#23
I added a few hundred grams of St. James Flake, Marlin Flake, and 4th Gen Small Batch to my mylar tote this morning and took the opportunity to do a rough weight check on the whole thing.

The clear-sided tote I have up in my little cubby is tapered, but max dimensions are 19.5"x13.5"x12". Presently has right about 11 pounds of tobacco at present, and I'd guess I can get another pound or two in before I won't be able to close the lid.
 

Wolfman

Well-known member
#25
I’m regards to long term cellaring, Is there an advantage of mylar over mason jars? Do they need to be sealed with a machine, and are they vacuumed sealed? I’ve been using mason jars for two years. I have close to one hundred. Since I’m going to continue building my cellar, what, if any advantage would there be to switch to mylar ?
 

Sonarman

Well-known member
#26
I’m regards to long term cellaring, Is there an advantage of mylar over mason jars? Do they need to be sealed with a machine, and are they vacuumed sealed? I’ve been using mason jars for two years. I have close to one hundred. Since I’m going to continue building my cellar, what, if any advantage would there be to switch to mylar ?
I can only answer one part. No vacuum seal and just use an iron to heat seal the end of the bag.
 

millarddj

Perpetual whippersnapper
Patron
#27
I’m regards to long term cellaring, Is there an advantage of mylar over mason jars? Do they need to be sealed with a machine, and are they vacuumed sealed? I’ve been using mason jars for two years. I have close to one hundred. Since I’m going to continue building my cellar, what, if any advantage would there be to switch to mylar ?
I think your questions can be well answered in the original thread which Jerry started here (and which I cited in my OP for this thread): https://pipesmokersdens.com/threads/mylar-bags-for-tobacco-storage.5452/ ).

But to summarize from my point of view:

  • Mylar is much lighter than mason jars
  • Mylar is overall cheaper than mason jars, for the quantity of tobacco you can store
  • Mylar is substantially more compact than a pile of glass jars
  • I seal mine, like @Sonarman, with a garden-variety clothes iron. This means they are not vacuum sealed, nor do most blends need to be vacuum sealed
 

Slow Tri

Is it Friday yet?
#28
But to summarize from my point of view:

  • Mylar is much lighter than mason jars
  • Mylar is overall cheaper than mason jars, for the quantity of tobacco you can store
  • Mylar is substantially more compact than a pile of glass jars
  • I seal mine, like @Sonarman, with a garden-variety clothes iron. This means they are not vacuum sealed, nor do most blends need to be vacuum sealed
I agree with everything you said above. I use my wife's hair straightener set to 400F instead of an iron but the result is the same.

I moved about 3 years ago and I still remember having to move/haul all of those jars while being careful not to drop anything. HEAVY! Won't do that again. So far I have moved all of my C & D tins, all of my open tins that weren't already in jars, and about 10 lbs of bulk tobacco so far.

Working out like a dream so far.
 

kxg

Well-known member
Patron
#29
I received my bags in the mail. I have a couple of shipments from Watch City to bag up. Today I stopped by the second-hand store on the off chance they might have an iron for cheap (not wanting to be discovered using my wife's good iron, even though she rarely uses it and it likely wouldn't hurt it; it's not worth the hassle). No iron; but they did have one of those hair straightening irons, the wand-like apparatus with ceramic coated heating elements; adjustable, and it worked. All for the princely sum of $2.00. Even if it fails, not much is risked.
Now to find the time to pack some bags! I'll keep you posted.
 

Oouder

Well-known member
#36
FWIW My Compton’s tobacco all tastes great and has aged without going flat. I’m still opening bags from 2009 with no issues. Those Mylar bags Maxim used were very thin compared to what we are using now.


I’ve long had to hide everything but one shelf of pipes/tobacco so I don’t miss the look of the jars because I never had them out. Still planning to snap those pics of my Mylar switch I’ve just been quite busy (September has a LOT of birthdays).
 

kxg

Well-known member
Patron
#39
I finally got around to bagging up my Watch City shipments. As of now I have 4.75 pounds of tobacco in 21 pint bags. There was a short learning curve finding the best method to fill the bags. The coarser cut burley blends were 4oz to the bag and the ribbon cut Virginia blends were 3oz to the bag to allow for some air space for aging purposes. My $2.00 flat hair iron worked great; sealing was the easiest part! I'll post some pics at some point.
 
#40
to allow for some air space for aging purposes.
I was wondering what you guys would do. Obviously, the tins are sealed with very little air in them,
while most people do leave room in their jars.

I've read GL Peases information on his homepage about aging, which are very interesting indeed, but
there was never a mention on how much air/ oxygen you'd want to leave in your jar/bag.

on the other hand: I doubt anyone has ever done any long term AB tests and even if so, results
may be highly subjective due to personal taste and preference.

For my part: since the tins don't contain a lot of air, I assume that a little goes a long way... so I
vacuum seal my mylar bags the best my sealer will do.