The Great Mylar Migration

blackmouth210

Friendly Misanthrope
Patron
Great point, so what size do you recommend? I have a pound of SJF on the way and intended to bag it...
I bought both the pint and the quart size gusseted from Pleasant Grove. They are the perfect size for me. The pint are great for those blends you only have a few ounces of (or less). The quart holds blends you want to store in large quantities.
I recommend both sizes in the 7mil.
 

sfduke

Well-known member
Sales
I bought both the pint and the quart size gusseted from Pleasant Grove. They are the perfect size for me. The pint are great for those blends you only have a few ounces of (or less). The quart holds blends you want to store in large quantities.
I recommend both sizes in the 7mil.
I have been now ordering the clear front bags. Love them
 

kxg

Well-known member
Patron
I put 3-4 ounces in the pint bags, depending on the cut of the blend. I use the 1 Pint 7-Mil Gusseted Zip Seal Mylar Bag from Pleasant Grove (topmylar.com). I suppose the quart bags will hold twice as much. I like the pint size as that is the most I want to open at a time for smoking stock. But, whatever works for you!
 

blackmouth210

Friendly Misanthrope
Patron
I put 3-4 ounces in the pint bags, depending on the cut of the blend. I use the 1 Pint 7-Mil Gusseted Zip Seal Mylar Bag from Pleasant Grove (topmylar.com). I suppose the quart bags will hold twice as much. I like the pint size as that is the most I want to open at a time for smoking stock. But, whatever works for you!
I agree. Those pint size bags are perfect for what you describe. I am amazed by how much you can fit in the quart size if you make sure the bottom (gusset) is open and press the tobacco down as you fill.
 
After having moved all my stuff from jars to mylar, a few notes:

Topmylar.com is awesome. My bags shipped MINUTES after I ordered them, and arrived on my doorstep in a few days.

I went with the clear front bags - very happy that I can still see my blends and how much I have on hand.

You will save a bunch of room, HOWEVER - baskets are a must for organizing and easy access, especially with the smaller (pint?) bags.

IMG_3168.JPG IMG_3169.JPG
I'm able to stash the larger pouches behind my pipe stand and they stand on their own quite well.

IMG_3170.JPG
 

kxg

Well-known member
Patron
Just to provide the data on the clear front bags. From the TopMylar.com site:
From the "Information" section. (Emphasis mine)
"Pleasant Grove Farm manufactures foil barrier bags (aka mylar bags) using a lamination process that yields a film consisting of 3 layers. The outer layer is made from BoPET (Biaxially-oriented Polyester). BoPET (Mylar) is a clear, translucent polyester film. Our bags have a middle layer of Aluminum metal (much like heavy duty aluminum foil). The inner-most layer is polyethylene plastic which is safe for direct food contact and allows for convenient heat sealing. Together these 3 layers comprise a high quality film that is 7-mil (177 microns) in thickness.
The thickness of the inner aluminum foil layer and the thickness of the film overall contributes significantly to the reliability of the bag for long term storage and also to the cost."


From the information on the clear front bags:
7 Mil Thick Mylar Film
Front side: (2x BoPET / PE)
Back side: (BoPET / AL / PE)

The clear front bags lack the aluminum foil layer but are still three layers thick; two Mylar and one Polyethylene.
I always thought that Mylar had to have the foil layer, but I was wrong. I would guess (again perhaps incorrectly) the clear front bags might lack some strength and obviously more risk from light infiltration. Other than that, they are Mylar all the way. That said, I've yet to use them, but I may try them on my next order - that is if I ever get out of the TAD doghouse.
 
Just to provide the data on the clear front bags. From the TopMylar.com site:
From the "Information" section. (Emphasis mine)
"Pleasant Grove Farm manufactures foil barrier bags (aka mylar bags) using a lamination process that yields a film consisting of 3 layers. The outer layer is made from BoPET (Biaxially-oriented Polyester). BoPET (Mylar) is a clear, translucent polyester film. Our bags have a middle layer of Aluminum metal (much like heavy duty aluminum foil). The inner-most layer is polyethylene plastic which is safe for direct food contact and allows for convenient heat sealing. Together these 3 layers comprise a high quality film that is 7-mil (177 microns) in thickness.
The thickness of the inner aluminum foil layer and the thickness of the film overall contributes significantly to the reliability of the bag for long term storage and also to the cost.”


From the information on the clear front bags:
7 Mil Thick Mylar Film
Front side: (2x BoPET / PE)
Back side: (BoPET / AL / PE)

The clear front bags lack the aluminum foil layer but are still three layers thick; two Mylar and one Polyethylene.
I always thought that Mylar had to have the foil layer, but I was wrong. I would guess (again perhaps incorrectly) the clear front bags might lack some strength and obviously more risk from light infiltration. Other than that, they are Mylar all the way. That said, I've yet to use them, but I may try them on my next order - that is if I ever get out of the TAD doghouse.
Great info. Thanks for posting.
 

Peacock

There is no spoon.
P
Just to provide the data on the clear front bags. From the TopMylar.com site:
From the "Information" section. (Emphasis mine)
"Pleasant Grove Farm manufactures foil barrier bags (aka mylar bags) using a lamination process that yields a film consisting of 3 layers. The outer layer is made from BoPET (Biaxially-oriented Polyester). BoPET (Mylar) is a clear, translucent polyester film. Our bags have a middle layer of Aluminum metal (much like heavy duty aluminum foil). The inner-most layer is polyethylene plastic which is safe for direct food contact and allows for convenient heat sealing. Together these 3 layers comprise a high quality film that is 7-mil (177 microns) in thickness.
The thickness of the inner aluminum foil layer and the thickness of the film overall contributes significantly to the reliability of the bag for long term storage and also to the cost."


From the information on the clear front bags:
7 Mil Thick Mylar Film
Front side: (2x BoPET / PE)
Back side: (BoPET / AL / PE)

The clear front bags lack the aluminum foil layer but are still three layers thick; two Mylar and one Polyethylene.
I always thought that Mylar had to have the foil layer, but I was wrong. I would guess (again perhaps incorrectly) the clear front bags might lack some strength and obviously more risk from light infiltration. Other than that, they are Mylar all the way. That said, I've yet to use them, but I may try them on my next order - that is if I ever get out of the TAD doghouse.
phew! Good to know. I was starting to move all my blends to non-clear bags. Sealed my first up last night with an iron - worked great!
 

cigrmaster

Well-known member
I will never put my tins in any type of bag as I have never had an issue with them no matter how old or what shape. Year after year, tin after tin, not a single failure and all I do is keep them in a cool dark place that stays at 73-74 degrees and constant humidity. The only time I touch a tin is to open it and smoke it. Once a tin is open I put it in 4 different tupperware like container that holds other open tins I am smoking from. These containers will keep open tins fresh for years. I normally have 20-25 open tins to smoke out of as I like variety.
I have jars f tobacco that are aging nicely and feel no need to do anything differently with them. Any jar I have ever opened had the tobacco in perfect condition. I don't really get this whole move to mylar as will it actually protect a tin that has had large temp and humidity changes? I believe that people having trouble with tins may have big temp and humidity changes. I cannot be the only guy who has never had a tin fail.

I also don't understand why someone would take tobacco out of a perfectly good jar and put it in mylar. Does anyone know what long term aging in mylar does to tobacco? Does it impart a plastic smell or taste to it?
 

kxg

Well-known member
Patron
While I don't plan to convert my jars to bags, I have started bagging my bulk tobacco purchases in the 7 mil gusseted Mylar pint bags. They don't really have a plastic smell and while I've not tasted them, I don't believe that will be an issue. I've limited storage space and the bags simply make sense for future purchases. The only downside is the bags are not as aesthetically pleasing as jars with printed labels. The bags have a heavy duty zip lock top that is also heat sealed. Regardless of jar or bag, I don't use any containers larger than pint size as I only want to open larger containers and stop or stunt the aging process. The only tins I've bagged area few rectangular tins that can have seal problems. I don't see a real necessity to bag my tins. All that said, to each his own.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
will it actually protect a tin that has had large temp and humidity changes?
I believe that to be the case. If you double seal a tin (which putting it into a mylar bag is) the breaking of one seal will not result in much damage as long as the other is intact.
I thing that's exactly what you were referring to: people that don't have ideal storing conditions can help themselves that way.
Humidity will also result in rusting tins in some cases, so: for some people, there is much sense in this imo. For others (like you)
it's unnecessary.

I also don't understand why someone would take tobacco out of a perfectly good jar and put it in mylar. Does anyone know what long term aging in mylar does to tobacco? Does it impart a plastic smell or taste to it?
Mylar has been used for a long time for long term storage of high prices spices. If it's good enough to store $ 1000 bucks worth of saffron, why not
for $10 bucks worth of tobacco. Again: this is my opinion.

I'm not going overkill on the mylar thing, but the bags are cheap. I am sealing my noobacco press production in those and I'll see what happens.
I am expecting positive results and I've stated a couple of reasons for that. I might be wrong, and I'll eventually learn from that if so.
 

SeanConnery

Well-known member
Sales
If you watch those MRE review channels on youtube, the contents of modern thick poly bag are fine for decades. They find spoil inside due to the packaging of the individual contents. metal goes rusty. Paper breaks down. Dehydrated milk goes bad. Some food additives break down over time*.

Much of which can be offset by an oxygen remover packet.

If you want BCA fresh as the day you bought it, throw an o2 remover in the jar or mylar.

If you want the tobaccos to oxidize, go without.

Virginia oxidizes fairly okay hence we jar a lot of it long term.