The Great Mylar Migration

I have no first hand experience when it comes to using oxygen absorbers but I have read some of material on it so here it is as I understand it.

When using an oxygen absorber in storing tobacco, you stop any sort of aging it might have. It's best used with aromatic blends as an oxygen absorber should protect whatever topping there is. I myself have packed a few aromatic blends I like as more of an experiment for personal fun. I'll let you know in twenty or so years if Captain Black Grape is still delicioso.
:whistle:

I do think they could keep a tobacco (for the most part) the same as they were when packed, maybe. I say this as one who has tried some food items that were over twenty years old (rice, dried fruit and vegetables) and found them to taste the same as their fresh counterparts. Those absorbers in a sealed environment do a good job together.

And by "fresh counterparts" I mean the same kind of items packed away for maybe a year or more. So they were fresh by comparison.
 

gnossos

the pineapple on your pizza
Patron
I have no first hand experience when it comes to using oxygen absorbers but I have read some of material on it so here it is as I understand it.

When using an oxygen absorber in storing tobacco, you stop any sort of aging it might have. It's best used with aromatic blends as an oxygen absorber should protect whatever topping there is. I myself have packed a few aromatic blends I like as more of an experiment for personal fun. I'll let you know in twenty or so years if Captain Black Grape is still delicioso.
:whistle:

I do think they could keep a tobacco (for the most part) the same as they were when packed, maybe. I say this as one who has tried some food items that were over twenty years old (rice, dried fruit and vegetables) and found them to taste the same as their fresh counterparts. Those absorbers in a sealed environment do a good job together.

And by "fresh counterparts" I mean the same kind of items packed away for maybe a year or more. So they were fresh by comparison.
Yeah that makes sense, after I posted I seemed to recall folks saying that oxygen was a part of the process, so removing it wouldn't make a ton of sense.
 
Do not use the absorbers. Will dry out the baccy. You want some air inside the bags. Just hand press out the air. Very easy.
I'm not sure if the oxygen absorbers would dry out the tobacco. It only removes oxygen and are used in all sorts of products like jerky and they still have a certain amount of moisture. I dont truly know though, I have some packed away as an experiment but its going to be years before I know.

I do know there is food safe silica gel packs that will removed moisture and for sure dry out tobacco.
 

Yakster

Well-known member
Used five of my quart sized mylar bags today to put rice in straight from the store. We've had a moth infestation in the pantry and it's come to extreme measures. Regular Ziploc bags did nothing, the were even in the empty bags just chillin'. Right after I finished, the gallon sized bags I ordered for this from Pleasant Grove Farm with the O2 absorbers were delivered. Oh well.

Hoping to reserve the quart sized for baccy, got two more boxes of SG coming in soon.
 

blackmouth210

Friendly Misanthrope
Patron
Used five of my quart sized mylar bags today to put rice in straight from the store. We've had a moth infestation in the pantry and it's come to extreme measures. Regular Ziploc bags did nothing, the were even in the empty bags just chillin'. Right after I finished, the gallon sized bags I ordered for this from Pleasant Grove Farm with the O2 absorbers were delivered. Oh well.

Hoping to reserve the quart sized for baccy, got two more boxes of SG coming in soon.
Those moth infestations are no joke. I had the displeasure of dealing with one in my pantry about 10 years ago. It was such a PITA that I still panic if I see even a small moth anywhere near the door when someone is coming in or out of my home. I keep a can of bug killer by each door as a result of that nightmarish hassle.
 

FrankHall

Won't Curse You
Sales
Those moth infestations are no joke. I had the displeasure of dealing with one in my pantry about 10 years ago. It was such a PITA that I still panic if I see even a small moth anywhere near the door when someone is coming in or out of my home. I keep a can of bug killer by each door as a result of that nightmarish hassle.
I used to refurbish old felt fedoras. Had about 70 at one point. A moth infestation (that didn't affect my hats) caused me to clean and sell every single hat, then sanitize my studio condo. Ten years later I still have clothing moths in that condo - I'm thinking they are living in dryer lint somewhere in the wall, as there's no evidence of them in quantity - just a few here and there. I had something similar happen twenty years ago when I was buying and selling 100+ year old flannel baseball uniforms. I had a closet full of real beauties, but moths appeared and I sold every single one of them. Fortunately there is no cloth in pipes. I saved one old flannel uniform and two beautiful felt fedoras - wish I felt comfortable keeping more.

Clothing moths absolutely suck.
 

blackmouth210

Friendly Misanthrope
Patron
I used to refurbish old felt fedoras. Had about 70 at one point. A moth infestation (that didn't affect my hats) caused me to clean and sell every single hat, then sanitize my studio condo. Ten years later I still have clothing moths in that condo - I'm thinking they are living in dryer lint somewhere in the wall, as there's no evidence of them in quantity - just a few here and there. I had something similar happen twenty years ago when I was buying and selling 100+ year old flannel baseball uniforms. I had a closet full of real beauties, but moths appeared and I sold every single one of them. Fortunately there is no cloth in pipes. I saved one old flannel uniform and two beautiful felt fedoras - wish I felt comfortable keeping more.

Clothing moths absolutely suck.
Wow. That's unfortunate.
They seem so harmless to see them fluttering around too.