Who wants to collaborate on a 3d printed pipe?

okie

New member
I'm an industrial designer specializing in additive manufacturing, and I've been a pipe enthusiast for 20 years. I normally design things for defense applications, but I saw a 3d printed pipe the other day and thought it would be fun to do. I'm looking for someone with pipe making experience who would like to collaborate on this project with me. Basically I need someone who make make the bowl and stem, as I have no woodworking skills or equipment. I do however have access to multimillion dollar 3d printing facilities!

What I disliked about the 3d printed pipes I'm seeing is there's no demonstrable reason for them to be 3d printed. The printed portion of the pipe is completely superfluous and is there merely to check that box for marketing purposes. From a philosophical perspective, I hate that, because 3d printing is in fact extremely useful, and there's generally a way to practically apply it to most things.

I didn't have to think too hard to figure out how I would personally apply it to a smoking pipe. I'm a huge gourd fan, but the delicate and expensive nature of them doesn't lend itself to being on the go. Well, there's a technology I use very often that can make a 3d printed gourd that's just as light as the real thing, but many times stronger, and cheaper. So here it is. A "gourd" calabash that's rugged enough to take on the go. You could drop this on concrete and it would be unlikely to break, and even if it did it would be a 20 dollar mistake, vs. a 300 dollar one. Being that it's a travel pipe, I gave it a lid so you can pocket it without ash going all over the place.

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Yosemite

Klingon Ambassador to Terra
Patron
... I look forward to the day as material science progresses to where artificial briar can be printed...pick your grain, pick your shape...sell your soul and here's your pipe.... but that level manipulating matter may take more time than I have left....
but until that time I like your idea.... if 3D scanning gets down to the home level- perfect cases for pipes could be printed to protect our more fragile pipes
 

okie

New member
... I look forward to the day as material science progresses to where artificial briar can be printed...pick your grain, pick your shape...sell your soul and here's your pipe.... but that level manipulating matter may take more time than I have left....
but until that time I like your idea.... if 3D scanning gets down to the home level- perfect cases for pipes could be printed to protect our more fragile pipes
The scanning is definitely to that level. The caveat though is you generally have to paint the object to make it work. You could potentially wrap it in plastic cling wrap prior to painting if you were very careful to control wrinkles. Blue painters tape could be another option.

As far as printing an actual bowl, probably the most promising avenue would be the ceramics printers. I've not had good experiences with ceramic pipes, but with a specialized material it's possible you could make something that would compete with briar and meerschaum. I could actually see adding powdered meerschaum to a ceramic mixture to produce something along the lines of a pressed meerschaum. What's kind of exciting about a 3d printed bowl is you could have an internal lattice structure that would make it weightless without sacrificing performance. Or possibly even increase performance by sinking more heat or absorbing more moisture.
 

Bach6032

Well-known member
That is VERY cool!

3D printing a briar pipe seems out of reach, at least in terms of how we think about briars. But I wonder if a slurry could be created using finely ground meerschaum and used to 3D print a figure of any choosing? If so, count me in for this one:

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