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Why is Pipe Tobacco so Moist?

RedScot

Well-known member
I had a tweed jacket sans suede elbow patches. Never tried to smoke it, however, so I'm not sure how that helps move the ball.
I also agree completely with @dmkerr . Every pipe is a potential flake pipe.

I finished my Ennerdale experiment this afternoon. Report to follow - after my shower. During which I shall be decidedly not dry.
 

RedScot

Well-known member
The Ennerdale experiment proceeded thusly: One batch of Ennerdale was left out to dry for about 24 hours and roughly rubbed out. A second batch was extracted straight from the box and also rubbed out. From my tasting notes:
Dry as carp (DAC): Incredibly sweet. The lakeland essence is prominent but there's a vanilla-ish taste getting through, and a deeper (nutty?) note from somewhere.
Really creamy smoke. Good mouth "feel".
Lightly rubbed may be a good prep method for a smallish bowl. This is nice & cool at the halfway point. I should try cube-cutting to see if it changes temp/flavor.
There's a slight bitter note magnified on the snork. Not really distracting but it's there.
# of relights: 3

Straight outta the box (SOB):I can feel the moisture as I break up the flake, but no stickiness. Try that with a gooper.
Still incredibly sweet. The Lakeland essence is trumping all the rest here at the top of the bowl, but other notes are unquestionably there.
My tongue suggests that this might be a little hotter than the DAC burn-wise.
This bowl requires a lot more attention to keep it going, and by a decent margin.
Snork is a lot sting-ier.
The "creamy" note is still very present.
Again, the pipe didn't get overly warm, but this bowl is definitely not as cool as the DAC bowl.
End of the bowl is reminiscent of GH twists a little...and that is totally okay.
# of relights: 5

Conclusions: In this instance, I'm torn.
The DAC was easier to smoke. I use a variant of the Frank method to fill my pipes & for me it allows me to fill pretty consistently, but obviously I might have been a little too tight when I used the SOB. The draw felt right, but I still had to smoke much more mindfully. My cadence stays fairly consistent and the SOB just plain out needed more attention. With the DAC I could just sip and enjoy.
The nod in taste, however, goes to the damper flake. The lakeland essence was bossier in the first quarter of the bowl but settled down nicely through the rest of the smoke. The DAC had this off-key note that would show up occasionally. It didn't make me want to tap out the remainder of the pipe, but it was a little off-putting.
I need to smoke about 30 more bowls. That'll help me figure this out. Yeah.

Oh. And YMMV.
 

dmkerr

Fabulously non-descript
Staff member
There's nothing wrong with elbow patches, especially on a Harris Tweed Jacket. The rest just read as blah blah blah.
Nothing wrong with knee patches, either. I grew up with 'em. When one split, my mom put on a new one. I think my record was six. But hey, knew patches meant all 4 of us boys could wear the same clothes. Not at the same time, though....
 

Ernie Q

Well-known member
Sales
Apparently there's a guy on this Forum that knows a little about Tobacco, paging @Ernie Q
I just answered this question for one of you folks who DN'ed me about it...here is my response copied and pasted: Pasting does weird things on here so sorry about the wonky formatting:

"OK...this is a great question and I'll answer to the best of my knowledge.
First, why sell wet tobacco? Ask 3 manufacturers and they will give you 5 different answers...all designed to avoid answering the question.


1. In the case of the Gawiths, their tobaccos go through a steam pressing process which introduces a lot of moisture into the leaf. Some of the moisture, I'd wager. is pressed out. Drying the tobacco down to optimum levels is an extra step. Some manufacturers do it...like STG (Escudo, to me, is perfect for smoking out of the tin). Drying is a pain in the :ass:. I've heard a lot of guys online say "Oh, well they just want to make more money and sell you less tobacco" which is not the case. It really is a pain in the balls. one titch beyond dry enough and you have to re-moisten it.


2. There are two main compounds in tobacco which make it moist or, more precisely, "Pliable": So called "oils" , The natural oils in the leaf and/or the trace oils introduced through casing, and water. These oils are what give flavor to the tobacco. They are the lifeblood of the leaf's flavor. They also secondarily serve to make the leaf a bit more pliable..but its water content that determines how slowly the leaf burns, thus controlling the rate at which the oils release their flavors. (I know oil and water don't mix but these aren't really oils in the true sense, and if they are there may be natural or added emulsifiers in the leaf that help them to homogenize.

So A blend with too much moisture will need frequent relights and give a thin flavor...over-moist tobacco doesn't burn, it smolders. A tobacco that is too dry also dries out the "Oils" and you get a stale tasting smoke that may seem harsh because it burns too hot.


The trick is to dry a tobacco down to the point where the oils and water at both at the perfect level. The way I figure it out is I grab a handful of a mixture or rubbed out flake and squeeze it tightly in a ball in my fist. Then I release it and watch. A tobacco at the proper level will stay formed in a ball for a second and then slowly expand back to loose over about 5-10 seconds."




E.
 

Brit abroad

Well-known member
I just answered this question for one of you folks who DN'ed me about it...here is my response copied and pasted: Pasting does weird things on here so sorry about the wonky formatting:

"OK...this is a great question and I'll answer to the best of my knowledge.
First, why sell wet tobacco? Ask 3 manufacturers and they will give you 5 different answers...all designed to avoid answering the question.


1. In the case of the Gawiths, their tobaccos go through a steam pressing process which introduces a lot of moisture into the leaf. Some of the moisture, I'd wager. is pressed out. Drying the tobacco down to optimum levels is an extra step. Some manufacturers do it...like STG (Escudo, to me, is perfect for smoking out of the tin). Drying is a pain in the ::ass::. I've heard a lot of guys online say "Oh, well they just want to make more money and sell you less tobacco" which is not the case. It really is a pain in the balls. one titch beyond dry enough and you have to re-moisten it.


2. There are two main compounds in tobacco which make it moist or, more precisely, "Pliable": So called "oils" , The natural oils in the leaf and/or the trace oils introduced through casing, and water. These oils are what give flavor to the tobacco. They are the lifeblood of the leaf's flavor. They also secondarily serve to make the leaf a bit more pliable..but its water content that determines how slowly the leaf burns, thus controlling the rate at which the oils release their flavors. (I know oil and water don't mix but these aren't really oils in the true sense, and if they are there may be natural or added emulsifiers in the leaf that help them to homogenize.

So A blend with too much moisture will need frequent relights and give a thin flavor...over-moist tobacco doesn't burn, it smolders. A tobacco that is too dry also dries out the "Oils" and you get a stale tasting smoke that may seem harsh because it burns too hot.


The trick is to dry a tobacco down to the point where the oils and water at both at the perfect level. The way I figure it out is I grab a handful of a mixture or rubbed out flake and squeeze it tightly in a ball in my fist. Then I release it and watch. A tobacco at the proper level will stay formed in a ball for a second and then slowly expand back to loose over about 5-10 seconds."




E.
Thank you.
 

gnossos

Russian spambot
Patron
I just answered this question for one of you folks who DN'ed me about it...here is my response copied and pasted: Pasting does weird things on here so sorry about the wonky formatting:

"OK...this is a great question and I'll answer to the best of my knowledge.
First, why sell wet tobacco? Ask 3 manufacturers and they will give you 5 different answers...all designed to avoid answering the question.


1. In the case of the Gawiths, their tobaccos go through a steam pressing process which introduces a lot of moisture into the leaf. Some of the moisture, I'd wager. is pressed out. Drying the tobacco down to optimum levels is an extra step. Some manufacturers do it...like STG (Escudo, to me, is perfect for smoking out of the tin). Drying is a pain in the ::ass::. I've heard a lot of guys online say "Oh, well they just want to make more money and sell you less tobacco" which is not the case. It really is a pain in the balls. one titch beyond dry enough and you have to re-moisten it.


2. There are two main compounds in tobacco which make it moist or, more precisely, "Pliable": So called "oils" , The natural oils in the leaf and/or the trace oils introduced through casing, and water. These oils are what give flavor to the tobacco. They are the lifeblood of the leaf's flavor. They also secondarily serve to make the leaf a bit more pliable..but its water content that determines how slowly the leaf burns, thus controlling the rate at which the oils release their flavors. (I know oil and water don't mix but these aren't really oils in the true sense, and if they are there may be natural or added emulsifiers in the leaf that help them to homogenize.

So A blend with too much moisture will need frequent relights and give a thin flavor...over-moist tobacco doesn't burn, it smolders. A tobacco that is too dry also dries out the "Oils" and you get a stale tasting smoke that may seem harsh because it burns too hot.


The trick is to dry a tobacco down to the point where the oils and water at both at the perfect level. The way I figure it out is I grab a handful of a mixture or rubbed out flake and squeeze it tightly in a ball in my fist. Then I release it and watch. A tobacco at the proper level will stay formed in a ball for a second and then slowly expand back to loose over about 5-10 seconds."




E.
I thank you for legitimizing my firm held belief that crispy dry tobacco tastes stale