Work in Progress

UrbanPiper

Well-known member
Too bad I don’t know how
to do contrast staining.
View attachment 99176
Here you go. Someone else here may have more experience with this, but these are the steps I followed:
  1. Sand the pipe to 600 make sure it´s scratch-free.
  2. Wet sand 800 - 1000.
  3. Dry pipe with heat gun; make sure it´s hot.
  4. Apply dark stain (I used Dark Brown) to hot pipe.
  5. Let the pipe rest for 24 hours.
  6. Gently wet sand 1000 - 1500 grit, be patient
  7. Dry pipe with heat gun
  8. Mix light colored stain (I used Buckskin) with a drop of red stain. Apply to hot pipe
  9. Rest for 24 hours.
  10. Gently wet sand again with 1500 - 2500
  11. Dry pipe with heat gun
  12. Mix 1 part shellac and 10 parts denaturated alcohol
  13. Apply to pipe for 5 seconds, don't let dry
  14. Wipe off with cloth to seal the stain with shellac
  15. Rest pipe for an hour or so to harden shellac
  16. Polish gently with compounds. (I use Brown Tripoli then Blue All Purpose)
  17. Polish with carnauba, gently and be patient
  18. Buff with dry, lint free cloth
You should definitely give it a shot!

Here's the before...
IMG_20210502_44877.jpg
...and after
IMG_20210502_3991.jpg
 

Chasing Embers

Well-known member
Here you go. Someone else here may have more experience with this, but these are the steps I followed:
  1. Sand the pipe to 600 make sure it´s scratch-free.
  2. Wet sand 800 - 1000.
  3. Dry pipe with heat gun; make sure it´s hot.
  4. Apply dark stain (I used Dark Brown) to hot pipe.
  5. Let the pipe rest for 24 hours.
  6. Gently wet sand 1000 - 1500 grit, be patient
  7. Dry pipe with heat gun
  8. Mix light colored stain (I used Buckskin) with a drop of red stain. Apply to hot pipe
  9. Rest for 24 hours.
  10. Gently wet sand again with 1500 - 2500
  11. Dry pipe with heat gun
  12. Mix 1 part shellac and 10 parts denaturated alcohol
  13. Apply to pipe for 5 seconds, don't let dry
  14. Wipe off with cloth to seal the stain with shellac
  15. Rest pipe for an hour or so to harden shellac
  16. Polish gently with compounds. (I use Brown Tripoli then Blue All Purpose)
  17. Polish with carnauba, gently and be patient
  18. Buff with dry, lint free cloth
You should definitely give it a shot!

Here's the before...
View attachment 99376
...and after
View attachment 99377
I'd say you knocked that one out of the park.👍
 

Cramptholomew

It's, like, Phyllis Diller funny.
Sales
Here you go. Someone else here may have more experience with this, but these are the steps I followed:
  1. Sand the pipe to 600 make sure it´s scratch-free.
  2. Wet sand 800 - 1000.
  3. Dry pipe with heat gun; make sure it´s hot.
  4. Apply dark stain (I used Dark Brown) to hot pipe.
  5. Let the pipe rest for 24 hours.
  6. Gently wet sand 1000 - 1500 grit, be patient
  7. Dry pipe with heat gun
  8. Mix light colored stain (I used Buckskin) with a drop of red stain. Apply to hot pipe
  9. Rest for 24 hours.
  10. Gently wet sand again with 1500 - 2500
  11. Dry pipe with heat gun
  12. Mix 1 part shellac and 10 parts denaturated alcohol
  13. Apply to pipe for 5 seconds, don't let dry
  14. Wipe off with cloth to seal the stain with shellac
  15. Rest pipe for an hour or so to harden shellac
  16. Polish gently with compounds. (I use Brown Tripoli then Blue All Purpose)
  17. Polish with carnauba, gently and be patient
  18. Buff with dry, lint free cloth
You should definitely give it a shot!

Here's the before...
View attachment 99376
...and after
View attachment 99377
This is a very good result. I would venture to say the method is overly complicated, though. And, there are a few things to be wary of. You don't need to let the stain sit for 24 hours. It just needs to dry. I don't bother heating up the block, either. I would dark stain at 400, then come back and sand at 400 again. This will bring out the scratches so you can remove them. At this point, you can over stain again, and move up to 600 through 800 (or 1000, whatever is your bent). Then I'd apply a light colored, or diluted contrast stain. Since you've already sanded to 1000, you really don't need to sand again - especially since the stain is alcohol based, and doesn't raise the grain. You COULD wipe the whole thing down with DNA to remove some of the contrast stain. I would then apply your shellac, or drying oil to set the whole thing. I don't bother trying to wipe the shellac off if it's diluted enough, but I do wipe off drying oils after 20 or so minutes. I'll usually do 2 coats of drying oil, and let it harden for 48 hours. You could also do a french polish with shellac and a drying oil. Buff as you would. You can also use a muslin wheel after wax. @Spillproof mentioned that, and it works well.

When/if wet sanding, do not wet sand the stem/shank junction. The moisture will raise the grain, and you end up with a mess where your flush fit should be practically seemless.
 

dimik

Well-known member
Here you go. Someone else here may have more experience with this, but these are the steps I followed:
  1. Sand the pipe to 600 make sure it´s scratch-free.
  2. Wet sand 800 - 1000.
  3. Dry pipe with heat gun; make sure it´s hot.
  4. Apply dark stain (I used Dark Brown) to hot pipe.
  5. Let the pipe rest for 24 hours.
  6. Gently wet sand 1000 - 1500 grit, be patient
  7. Dry pipe with heat gun
  8. Mix light colored stain (I used Buckskin) with a drop of red stain. Apply to hot pipe
  9. Rest for 24 hours.
  10. Gently wet sand again with 1500 - 2500
  11. Dry pipe with heat gun
  12. Mix 1 part shellac and 10 parts denaturated alcohol
  13. Apply to pipe for 5 seconds, don't let dry
  14. Wipe off with cloth to seal the stain with shellac
  15. Rest pipe for an hour or so to harden shellac
  16. Polish gently with compounds. (I use Brown Tripoli then Blue All Purpose)
  17. Polish with carnauba, gently and be patient
  18. Buff with dry, lint free cloth
You should definitely give it a shot!

Here's the before...
View attachment 99376
...and after
View attachment 99377
That looks really nice. I used to play around with the iron acetate - tannic acid method with amazing results when restoring some pipes. There is just something really cool about contrast staining.