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snake

permanent ankle biter
Sales
Patron
I see shellac being tossed around. Is this important?
I have friction polishes, and Teak oil which is what I
normally use when finishing tampers. Just don't want
to buy a lot of shellac when I don't have to. Besides,
I may not use it ever again.

Oh, and can I use India Ink instead of leather dye for
the dark stain?
 

dimik

Well-known member
I see shellac being tossed around. Is this important?
I have friction polishes, and Teak oil which is what I
normally use when finishing tampers. Just don't want
to buy a lot of shellac when I don't have to. Besides,
I may not use it ever again.

Oh, and can I use India Ink instead of leather dye for
the dark stain?
I’m no expert by any means, but I’ve played around with shellac. If you buy the chips, you can make a solution to your liking. A 1# solution basically doesn’t change the way your work piece looks or changes the texture of the wood, but seals in the colors. A 2# solution will add a very faint gloss and adds a light smooth feel. 3# starts to get into the high gloss territory, similar to polyurethane. As far as I know, it’s not super thermo stable, and isn’t used very much for smooth finishes in the pipe world.

As for India ink, that’s a really interesting question. I imagine it would behave much like an oil-based stain in terms of vibrancy of colors and penetration into the woods. Probably would require some kind of a sealant though.

I may be wrong, of course, but this is my experience with wood working, though most of it is not pipe or tamper related.
 

luttrell31

Member
I see shellac being tossed around. Is this important?
I have friction polishes, and Teak oil which is what I
normally use when finishing tampers. Just don't want
to buy a lot of shellac when I don't have to. Besides,
I may not use it ever again.

Oh, and can I use India Ink instead of leather dye for
the dark stain?
I would think on tampers the shellac wouldn't be very important. On pipes the main reason we use it is to give a "base coat" of polish to build off of . It kind of clogs up the pores some and allows the polishes to build and still allow the wood to "breath" some so you don't end up with stain all over your hand when the pipe gets hot. Someone with more experience may correct me on this though.
 

Cramptholomew

It's, like, Phyllis Diller funny.
Sales
I don't normally use shellac by itself on smooths. I have done a sort of french polish method before with thin shellac and danish oil, which works well. Right now, I'm experimenting using pure tung oil cut 50/50 with a citrus based drying oil. Really, though, it's used more to set the stain, and does add some amount of extra shine. That said, I've gotten some pretty high gloss finish on raw briar without any top coat. I usually use a top coat anyway, though, because it does create a microscopic "shell" to protect the wood, and aids in polishing. I think J. Alan has a video on briar "breathing", and basically debunks that aspect of it.

@snake I haven't tried india ink. I would see what happens with a cut off. You don't actually NEED a secondary color to "contrast stain", either. I've had perfectly good results using black, or cordovan by itself, and just sanding up to 800 or 1000.
 

Mrm1775

Well-known member
Sales
I don't see shellac as a NEED. To me it's an option.
I use a 3# - 5# cut (pretty thin) and use it very sparingly. Do multiple coats and you get more sheen.

The finish that you normally apply to your tampers looks great.

I follow @Cramptholomew on oil finish. I've been using Danish oil cut with citric oil and I really like it.

I can't wait to see what you turn out
 

Notow1

Well-known member
Sales
Well I am attempting to make an olive wood bulldog and can say this will be the last bulldog I make. I have so much respect for the pipe makers that can make one and keep all the lines straight. This is going to take a long time but I will get it right and sell it as a collector's item. So far it is looking good.
Norm
 

Notow1

Well-known member
Sales
Well I am attempting to make an olive wood bulldog and can say this will be the last bulldog I make. I have so much respect for the pipe makers that can make one and keep all the lines straight. This is going to take a long time but I will get it right and sell it as a collector's item. So far it is looking good.
Norm
Okay @Ozark Wizard You forced Me to take a couple of photos. This has a long way to go.
Norm
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